Andreas Whittam Smith

Andreas Whittam Smith was a financial journalist until 1985 when he led the team that founded The Independent. The paper’s first editor (1986-1994), he has subsequently been the president of the British Board of Film Classification (1998-2002) and chairman of the Financial Ombudsman Service (1998-2003). He is currently First Church Estates Commissioner responsible for £5bn of the Church's investments, and chairman of the Children's Mutual.

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Will nobody confront the hackers and blaggers in pin-striped suits?

The two explanations put forward by Soca for its inaction have the marks of having been thought up at the last minute

The Keogh report leaves us asking - what is Government for?

The cost of various Health Secretaries’ interventions has been heavy

The Archbishop of York Dr John Sentamu and the Archbishop of Canterbury the Most Rev Justin Welby, talk to each other during discussions over women in the Episcopate at the General Synod

Women bishops at last? Law debated by Church of England Synod

Members of the General Synod agree to begin next stage on proposals

George Osborne's latest flop over 'shares for rights' is typical of modern government

Since it became law the Department for Business has received only four inquiries, but this measure's history says a lot about the replacement of ideology with marketing

Don’t mourn the universities that go bust

The new commercial battleground that is the student “experience” will undoubtedly lead to a radical restructuring of higher education - and maybe that's no bad thing

If Google is in the dock about child sex abuse, then so are judges

There can be no one solution to the problem society has with sexual violence

<p> Soldiers lining up in the trenches </p>

The war to end all wars? It lasted 75 years

The Austro-Hungarian empire was a sort of central European union

How the French lost their je ne sais quoi

They see globalisation as a process that destroys individual cultures and identities

Who’s the odd one out in Europe? Not us

France has left Germany's side and the public mood is heading South

If you believe investors, we’re on the mend

These price movements represent the considered opinion of thousands of professionals

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Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

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The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor