Andrew Martin

Journalist and novelist Andrew Martin is the author of the 'Jim Stringer' series of novels based around railways. He has written for the Independent on Sunday, the Evening Standard, the Sunday Times and the New Statesman among others.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

Man's World

THERE'S MUCH talk about the increasing homogeneity of this country but the North is actually astonishingly different from the South. Geoff Boycott is one good example of this.

Football: Ferri across the Mersey for Houllier

GeRARD HOULLIER'S first excursion into the transfer market as the sole Liverpool manager was to bring a fellow Frenchman to Merseyside yesterday. Jean-Michel Ferri, a 29-year-old defensive midfielder, became Houllier's first signing when he paid Istanbulspor pounds 1.2m for the uncapped player.

Man's World

CELEBRATING a minor triumph, I went to tea at the Ritz. But no sooner had I sat down than a tail-coated functionary demanded I hand over my mac, thus triggering my tipping complex and killing any prospect of enjoying myself.

Real living: Man's world

IN THAT sumptuous stationers, Smythson, in New Bond Street, there are beautiful books marked "Anecdotes" so that you can list every amusing story you know from one to a hundred, thereby proving that you are the most boring and anally retentive person the world has ever known.

Man's world

I AM not a particularly fashion- conscious person, as the lady who runs my local Oxfam - whose eyes light up whenever I walk in - will testify. To me, in fact, there are few more depressing words than "fashion special" when written on the front of a normally perfectly decent colour supplement, but I did happen to glean the other day that tie knots are getting smaller.

Man's world: Andrew Martin

TO ANY readers disappointed by the fact that this column is not written - as every other column in Britain is - by a television celebrity, I can only apologise, and point out that I have at least tried to break into the broadcast media.

Joys Of Modern Life: 17: Eurostar

HAPPINESS, THEY say, writes white, so it would be hard for me to express how I feel sitting on Eurostar with a cup of coffee en route to a few bieres and dinner on the Left Bank.

Real living: Man's World

I ONCE HEARD an edition of "Any Questions" in which the panel were asked the somewhat elemental question: is it better to be a man or a woman?

Man's World

MEL SMITH and Griff Rhys-Jones once parodied the Angry Young Men of the 1950's. Their own, bathetic version of this phenomenon was "the mildly irritable young men" who were forever sullenly muttering, "What bloody time do you call this then?"

Motorcycling: Smart's joint challenge of cash and competitiveness

Ignoring the easy option in a divided sport, a young British motorcycli st with a famous family is struggling to develop his undoubted talent
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine