Anna Pavord

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Anna Pavord: 'Gardening brings a joy both physical and metaphysical'

It simultaneously connects us to and frees us from the wider world, says our gardening correspondent

Martagons, like Turk's Cap, put on a colourful show and thrive in a shady border

Anna Pavord: 'Martagon is an adaptable, shade-loving and rather beautiful early bloomer'

Once considered a relatively minor branch of the lily family, there are now dozens of stunning varieties of martagon
Altamont Gardens: home to rare plants, ancient oaks and sumptuous landscaping

Anna Pavord: 'There is a special joy to be found in exploring the lush gardens of Ireland'

They have a character all of their own: relaxed, rolling and replete with narrative, says our gardening correspondent

Anna Pavord: 'How do gardeners deal with August - the month of messiness?'

The August garden is a frustrating place to be: plants are either sprouting crazily in every direction, or withering drably

Anna Pavord: 'Bay trees are hardy and produce leaves that cooks will appreciate having to hand'

Anna Pavord has been lucky to have inherited old bay trees in both the places she's lived in Dorset

Great Dixter: a style of planting that has absolutely nothing to do with formality or restraint

Anna Pavord on Great Dixter: 'There's a dynamism you don't find anywhere else'

Nearly 10 years on from the death of the great Christopher Lloyd, the garden he created at Great Dixter in Sussex has retained all its joy, exuberance and subversiveness

Anna Pavord: 'Bindweed is a bully - so how far should you let nature take over?'

Bindweed grows prodigiously fast, twining around the stems of anything within reach

How to grow your own raspberries

Shop-bought raspberries remain expensive so they are worth growing at home, says Anna Pavord

Anna Pavord: 'A growing taste for artisanal blooms may turn the tide on imported flowers'

Our gardening correspondent meets Georgie Newbery, owner of Common Farm Flowers

Anna Pavord: 'Why grow onions and shallots? Stick to salad leaves, tomatoes and sweetcorn'

The crops that are the most worth growing at home are the ones that are expensive to buy, or those where the flavour of the home-grown produce is way beyond the level of anything you can buy in the shops

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