Annalisa Barbieri

Aside from The Independent, Annalisa Barbieri writes for the Economist's Intelligent Life magazine, and the New Statesman. A former contributing editor of the Independent on Sunday and fishing correspondent of the Independent, she is also patron of Rights of Women

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Back for another curtain call

Floaty muslin and minimalist blinds are being usurped by heavier, traditional window fabrics. Lights out, says ANNALISA BARBIERI

Is it worth it... Bang & Olufsen BeoTalk 1100

Any piece of technology that shields you from people you don't want to speak to is worth its weight in gold. All answering machines do this to an extent but the Bang & Olufsen BeoTalk 1100 (pounds 150) does it differently. One of its functions is that, if you input numbers from people you never want to speak to, when these non-folk ring they will get a dead tone. So you don't even need to hear their voices. Can there be a more chilling brush-off?

Fishing: Sweet moments at the window as salmon run free

IRELAND, A country I had been meaning to fish for ages. All I ever heard was "you have to fish in southern Ireland, you'll fall in love with it, wonderful scenery, blah blah blah." Most of this came from my fishing buddy Pete, who talks of this part of the world with the same faraway look that usually accompanies the memory of his first sea trout.

Angling: Where anglers mix with borderline psychopaths

Annalisa Barbieri on fishing

`Hey bellissima, where have you been all my life?'

Prepare yourself for those Mediterranean boys by taking some expert advice from Annalisa Barbieri - she's heard every line in the book

Fishing: Dartmoor daze with brainy brownies

GOD, I love Dartmoor. It's difficult, you can't take it for granted and it can change in a moment from a place of gobsmacking beauty to one of brooding menace. Obviously, then, it is female. Every year, at least once, I come here to breathe pure air and gaze upon her wild, abandoned magnificence.

Isn't a camera enough?

Paintings that look like photographs are suddenly back in vogue. Annalisa Barbieri finds out why

Fishing: Smugglers break all the rules

Annalisa Barbieri on fishing

Fishing: Paranoia sets in as fish dry up

Annalisa Barbieri on fishing

Fashion: Hanging out in the men's room

here are times I long to be a man. I love the idea of wearing pants quite low on my hips and tight T-shirts like Chachi from Happy Days would wear (round-necked and sleeveless as in our picture) that would sit skinny on my chest, unencumbered by the swell of breasts. In this outfit, I would also be able to ride a motorbike without being a screaming sissy and be able to jump over railings using only one hand.
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