Anne Penketh

Anne Penketh is a freelance journalist and columnist based in Paris. She was posted to Moscow, Paris and New York for AFP news agency before joining The Independent, where she was Diplomatic Editor until 2009.

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Stéphane Charbonnier pictured in his office last October

Stéphane Charbonnier: Cartoonist and editor of Charlie Hebdo whose encapsulated the magazine’s confrontational brand of satire

He took to drawing as a teenager and did illustrations at school before submitting work to the local paper

Postcard from... Carnoët

On a barren hilltop in the heart of Brittany, 50 huge granite statues with primitive features dominate the landscape in a project which has become known as the Valley of the Saints. The six latest, installed last month, each weighed 15 tons.

The best known fragrances containing oakmoss include the orginal versions of Chanel No 5 and Miss Dior

Will a ban on oakmoss kill the French perfume industry?

Plans to ban the use of oakmoss, an essential ingredient of elite perfumes, has thrown the world of fragrance into disarray. Anne Penketh reports

Postcard from... Paris

An online campaign against sexism could be an uphill struggle in France. This is a country where nobody bats an eyelid at bus stops plastered with women parading their cleavages in bra adverts.

The vineyards of western France, including the Bordeaux region, are more susceptible to the fungi

Bumper French wine grape harvest clouded by threat of wood decay

Disease which rots vines now affects 12 per cent of vineyards and is spreading fast

Postcard from... Paris

French singer Jacques Higelin, “godfather” of the annual wine festival in Montmartre, urged the crowd to enjoy themselves.

Nord-Pas-de-Calais

Nord-Pas-de-Calais: The grim corner of Europe finding a new meaning in art and culture

The unlovely and unloved region is reinventing itself as a new cultural hotspot

Up to 2.5 million French people now live abroad

French say au revoir to France: Over two million French people now live abroad, and most are crossing the channel and heading to London

Opposition convinced people are leaving because of 'the impression that it’s impossible to succeed'

The fossils and human occupation at the prehistoric site in Tourville date from 236,000BC to 183,000BC

Archaeologists unearth remains of oldest Norman ever found which ‘fills gap in our knowledge of pre-Neanderthal evolution’

The arm bones, dating from 200,000 years ago, are 'the only known example from northern Europe'

Postcard from... Paris

Only days after reportedly being accused of being “hopeless” by the managing director of John Lewis, the French have demonstrated their flair for innovation and fun in the latest incarnation of the “nuits blanches” (white nights) in Paris.

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Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003