Anthony Rose - The Independent

Anthony Rose

Anthony Rose writes a column about wine for The Independent.

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Anthony Rose: 'Domaine de la Romanée-Conti has become the ultimate collector's wine'

It's no surprise that the tasting of the Domaine de la Romanée-Conti's latest release at Corney & Barrow's Tower of London offices took place in hushed tones. Yes, there's the reverence accorded to what the wine exchange Liv-ex calls 'the new darling of the fine wine trade', recently awarded number-one spot in its Top 10 global fine wine brands.

Anthony Rose: The Wine Society has shown a wine merchant can compete with supermarkets

If there's any truth in the notion that a wine merchant can't compete with the supermarkets on value, the idea has been knocked firmly on the head by The Wine Society.

Anthony Rose: Morrisons has devised The Taste Test to determine your flavour profile

The Morrisons' annual press tasting is normally a dreary affair with an insipid selection of brands that is nothing to write home about and an own-label range even less worth the second-class stamp. But the Leeds-based national supermarket chain, with its 479 stores, is up to something.

Anthony Rose: Keep it sweet

PX is a unique Spanish sweet wine that I discovered a while ago, so sweet in fact that it resulted in me having to make a trip to the dentist. PX, or Pedro, short for Pedro Ximénez, is one of the darkest, richest, stickiest wines in the world and by rights shouldn't exist as a wine at all. Oozing with viscous sucrosity, it's the perfect blending sweetener, in small doses, for cream sherry and sweet oloroso. Did someone dunk a finger in a cask of Pedro one day and think "I could get a pat on the back from the mouthwash industry for bottling this on its own"?

Anthony Rose: 'There's now so much superb syrah produced in so many countries'

The biggest curveball in the Pol Roger 60th anniversary blind wine tasting between Oxford and Cambridge last month was the extraordinary 2009 Kongsgaard Syrah, Hudson Vineyard, California. An inky syrah of peppery violety intensity, it was the only New World syrah to sit alongside the other 11 classic wines. Tasted blind, it was a particularly tough nut to crack because there's now so much superb syrah produced in so many countries.

Anthony Rose: 'Stores are donating 10 per cent from selected wines sales until Red Nose Day'

There’s something faintly comical about the notion of Wine Relief. Do you need relief from, or after, wine? Yet Comic Relief today, of which Wine Relief is a part, has become a serious business with Red Nose day the climax of a massive fun-raising (ha ha), exercise for worthwhile charitable causes across the UK and in Africa. While the joke may not be quite so hilarious after 25 years, Comic Relief’s achievements in raising more than £600 million in the fight against poverty and suffering is no laughing matter.

Anthony Rose: Could wine be embroiled in a similar scandal to horsegate?

Is there an ideal wine match for horse? Of course we all prefer a spot of dressage or a flutter at William Hill to eating them, and the sentimental taboo creates panic when we find horsemeat in our processed foods. How could you eat a Black Beauty, an Arkle or a Dobbin? I was horrified when I went to France as a teenager and came across shops called Chevaline. Not cheval, I whinnied: how could they? But staying with a family that reared horses in Africa, I soon learnt to live with the idea and wash it down with their mature claret.

Anthony Rose: 'These are a few bottles that have delivered satisfaction in spades'

It took me a while to work out what the famous bon viveur André Simon's was on about when he said there are no great wines, only great bottles. Investors who depend on a wine to increase in value might point to an objective standard of greatness, but the weight of expectation is a heavy burden. Many an anticipated 'great' bottle turns out to be a disappointment, many a no-expectations a lovely surprise, all the more so when the ambiance is right and the conversation flowing. Maybe your experience of delicious bottles doesn't chime with mine, but I can confidently say that these are a few bottles that have delivered satisfaction in spades.

Anthony Rose: 'The dry-January deniers are legion'

I'm not sure if the Independent's 'Peter Oborne' stuck to his New Year's resolution of a dry January, but if he or anyone else managed to overcome their "gloom and terror", then they deserve a pat on the back. Not that they'll get one from the I-could-if-I-wanted-to crowd. The dry-January deniers are legion, not just a self-interested wine industry and tax-hiking government, but those convincing themselves that daily alcohol consumption could only be someone else's problem.

Anthony Rose: Burgundy has grown in stature and popularity

Buy on apples, sell on cheese, so the old wine-trade adage goes. If the Himalayan mountains of cheese consumed during the frenzy of January's Burgundy 2011 week in London are anything to go by, a great deal of the region's wine has been sold en primeur before it's even been bottled and delivered. Do you need Burgundy in your cellar? No. Do you want Burgundy in your cellar? Why wouldn't you if you love wine? As Bordeaux alienates with arrogant pricing, Burgundy has grown in stature and popularity with much improved wine quality, more consistent vintages and greater availability.

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