Anthony Seldon

Anthony Seldon is a historian and commentator on contemporary Britain, in particular British political leadership and education. He is Master (headmaster) of Wellington College and co-founder of the Institute of Contemporary British History. His books include Brown at 10 (2010), Trust: How We Lost it and How to Get it Back (2009) and Blair's Britain, 1994 - 2007 (2007)

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The UK is falling behind on literacy

We all need to work together to make ignorance history

Governments of all parties infantilise schools and teachers by instructing them what to do, treating them like delinquents

Michael Gove visits Durand Academy School in Stockwell in 2011

Michael Gove on Radio 4: Doesn't a discussion about teaching History need a teacher on the panel?

The BBC should be doing much more to take schoolteaching seriously

Two soldiers on the concourse at Victoria station, London, about to leave for the front line. They are carrying parcels full of food and other provisions.

WW1: Let us remember - whether enemy or friend

There's no agreement about what the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War is to mark, when events should take place, and whether it is a celebration, or a wake

Higher Education: Why do so many students commit suicide?

There is a crisis going on in undergraduate pastoral care and it is the responsibility of our universities - and our schools - to address it

How do we regain trust in our institutions?

In the last decade the media, bankers, politicians and the police have all fallen from grace. If 2013 is to be a good year, rebuilding trust must be our first priority

Anthony Seldon: Let the Games inspire a new vision for schools

State schools may lack the facilities and length of day but why accept the status quo?

The Saturday Profile Viscount Cranborne, Conservative Peer: The last true blue blood

THE CONSERVATIVE Century opened in 1900 with a Lord Salisbury in 10 Downing Street running the nation's affairs, blithely disregarding the creeping modernism of New Liberalism and revelling in the House of Lords' pre-eminence over the British body politic. It ends with his great- great grandson, Lord Cranborne, revelling in the House of Lords' ability to defy New Labour's wishes over proportional representation for the European Parliamentary elections and championing a continuing role for great families in British politics. Plus ca change.

Not lucky, just good

PROFILE: John Major; The Prime Minister is Britain's own comeback kid.
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Day In a Page

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

Who remembers that this week we enter the 150th anniversary year of the end of the American Civil War, asks Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served

Homeless Veterans appeal

Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served
Downfall of Dustin 'Screech' Diamond, the 'Saved By The Bell' star charged with bar stabbing

Scarred by the bell

The downfall of the TV star charged with bar stabbing
Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Security breaches and overhyped start-ups dominated a year in which very little changed (save the size of your phone)
Cuba's golf revolution: But will the revolutionary nation take 'bourgeois' game to its heart?

Will revolutionary Cuba take 'bourgeois' golf to its heart?

Fidel Castro ridiculed the game – but now investment in leisure resort projects is welcome
The Locked Room Mysteries: As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor Otto Penzler explains the rules of engagement

The Locked Room Mysteries

As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor explains the rules of engagement
Amy Adams on playing painter Margaret Keane in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

How I made myself Keane

Amy Adams hadn’t wanted to take the role of artist Margaret Keane, because she’d had enough of playing victims. But then she had a daughter, and saw the painter in a new light
Ed Richards: Parting view of Ofcom chief. . . we hate jokes on the disabled

Parting view of Ofcom chief... we hate jokes on the disabled

Bad language once got TV viewers irate, inciting calls to broadcasting switchboards. But now there is a worse offender, says retiring head of the media watchdog, Ed Richards
A look back at fashion in 2014: Wear in review

Wear in review

A look back at fashion in 2014
Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015. Might just one of them happen?

Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015

Might just one of them happen?
War with Isis: The West needs more than a White Knight

The West needs more than a White Knight

Despite billions spent on weapons, the US has not been able to counter Isis's gruesome tactics, says Patrick Cockburn
Return to Helmand: Private Davey Graham recalls the day he was shot by the Taliban

'The day I was shot by the Taliban'

Private Davey Graham was shot five times during an ambush in 2007 - it was the first, controversial photograph to show the dangers our soldiers faced in Helmand province
Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Many flyers are failing to claim compensation to which they are entitled, a new survey has found
The stories that defined 2014: From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions

The stories that defined 2014

From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions
Stoke-on-Trent becomes first British city to be classified as 'disaster resilient' by the United Nations

Disaster looming? Now you know where to head...

Which British city has become the first to be awarded special 'resilience' status by the UN?