Ben Chu

Ben Chu is The Independent's Economics Editor. Previously he was the newspaper's chief leader writer.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

GDP finally tops 2008 peak, says NIESR

Britain's economy has finally recovered the ground it lost in the 2008-09 recession, according to the National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

Ukraine's President-elect Petro Poroshenko (left) and Russian President Vladimir Putin during an international D-Day commemoration ceremony

Risk managers fearful of danger to City from Ukraine crisis

Bank of England survey shows greater concern over possible conflict in region

European Central Bank imposes negative rates on banks in historic move

European Central Bank also slashed its benchmark interest rate to a new record low

Bank of England divided over dilemma of soaring house prices

An external member of the Financial Policy Committee poured cold water last night on hopes that the Bank of England's new macro-prudential toolkit would be able to prick asset bubbles. He hinted at a potential disagreement with Mark Carney, the Bank's Governor, and cast doubt on the widespread belief that the committee is poised for action to curb the housing boom.

Bank of England divided over dilemma of soaring house prices

UK house prices are rising at an annual rate of around 11% according to the Nationwide building society, but the price increases in London have been ever steeper

France goes into battle with US over BNP Paribas fine

French government has expressed its anger at reports the US authorities are planning to slap a $10bn fine on one of its major banks

Currency markets brace for clampdown after scandals

The Treasury and the UK’s financial regulators have signalled their intention to clampdown on the £3.1-trillion-a day foreign exchange market in the wake of the abuse allegations that have hit confidence in currency benchmarks.

Mario Draghi, the President of the ECB

German inflation plunge paves way for ECB rate cut

Inflation in the eurozone’s dominant economy sank to 0.6%

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, translated by Arthur Goldhammer - book review: 'Rich pickings in a convincing critique of capitalism'

Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century is simultaneously ambitious and modest. The book is ambitious because Piketty sets out to tell a high-level history of the global economy and to outline a fresh theory of where we are heading. It's the sort of grand intellectual enterprise that was common in the 19th century, but has become a rarity in our era of more specialised scholarship. But Capital's also modest because Piketty wants to put economics, his own discipline, back in its place. Refreshingly, he regards economics as merely a branch of the social sciences, eschewing the hubristic claims for supremacy made by some practitioners.

Visionary? Thomas Piketty’s thesis, that the West is in the midst of a new Gilded Age of inequality, has divided the US
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape