Brian Viner

Brian Viner swapped London for the Herefordshire countryside, and his column ‘Country Life’ documents his attempts to chase the rural idyll. Chiefly a sports writer, he pens a weekly sports column and interview for the paper. He is the author of 'Ali, Pele, Lillee and Me: A Personal Odyssey Through the Sporting Seventies'.

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Eric Bristow and Phil Taylor: How darts' motormouth mapped out glory for The Power

The Crafty Cockney talks up prospects of the forthcoming match between his one-time protégé and Andy 'The Viking' Fordham to decide the undisputed world champion

David Moyes: The art of sticking two fingers up at people from a great height

The Everton manager's approach to physical and mental fitness has brought European ambition to a side who seemed classic relegation material before the season started

Whatever happened to the art of losing graciously?

Had Wenger accepted defeat equably his reputation this morning would be enhanced

Will Greenwood: The loyal centre of England who has learned from tragedy and glory

If 2003 was the greatest year of Will Greenwood's career as a rugby player, 2004 has probably been the lanky centre's most disappointing.

Nick Faldo: British golf's misunderstood master launches a charm drive

Nick Faldo and I are sitting in the lounge of Burhill Golf Club in Surrey discussing why he has never been offered a knighthood. It is my contention that he should have been, and he doesn't disagree. "I'd be honoured. Crumbs.

Lost in the mists of mistaken identity as cricket's long autumn dulls the senses

The start of the football season in early August never passes without somebody grumbling that it's too early for football, that the height of summer is for cricket. Now the boot is on the other foot. The end of September is for football; cricket looks like an interloper. That is partly why the ICC Champions' Trophy, due to conclude today at The Oval, has aroused such little interest as to yield only a half-full Edgbaston for Tuesday's semi-final between England and Australia. What a shame that when we finally knock over the Aussies, it is not in front of a salivating full house.

Unity is the way to victory over the Americans

Here was a multinational group, representing all of Europe, pulling strongly in a single direction

George Bush searches for a decent swing as the hawks seek eagles in election year

If i had a bottom dollar, I would bet it on President George W Bush making political capital out of the United States winning the Ryder Cup this weekend. If they do win. Which remains a sizeable "if". But should it happen, Bush will feel entitled. His father's father, Prescott Bush, was secretary of the United States Golf Association, and his father's mother's father, George Herbert Walker, gave his name to the Walker Cup. So George W is golfing aristocracy. And he sure could do with a boost to his re-election campaign.

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