Cahal Milmo

Cahal Milmo is the chief reporter of The Independent and has been with the paper since 2000. He was born in London and previously worked at the Press Association news agency. He has reported on assignment at home and abroad, including Rwanda, Sudan and Burkina Faso, the phone hacking scandal and the London Olympics. In his spare time he is a keen runner and cyclist, and keeps an allotment.

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Alexander Perepilichnyy may have been poisoned

French police to probe death of Russian tax fraud whisteblower 'assassinated' during Paris trip

A US contact says that businessman Alexander Perepilichnyy was poisoned

The painting 'Jour D'Ete' as was stolen from the Tate Gallery in London, 14 April 1956

'We didn't really think we'd get away with it': The astonishing story of how two young Irish men completed an audacious £7m art heist

In 1956 Paul Hogan shocked the world by unhooking an Impressionist masterpiece from a wall in the Tate and carrying it calmly out of the gallery

Claudia Santos’s computer contained 800 target addresses of mainly Asian families

Jaw-dropping scale of UK-based Colombian crime syndicate revealed as key player is jailed

Mother-of-two Claudia Santos has been jailed for four-and-a-half years after conspiring to burgle 10 homes across south England in a month

Victorino Chua was found guilty by a jury at Manchester Crown Court of murdering and poisoning hospital patients

Stepping Hill nurse Victorino Chua: Worker who poisoned his own patients may have been employed without proper qualifications

Chua was convicted of 33 separate charges, including two of murder and 22 of attempted grievous bodily harm

Alexander Perepilichnyy lived in exile in Weybridge at the St Georges Hill estate

Billionaire Russian businessman found dead outside Surrey home could have been poisoned

Alexander Perepilichnyy, who collapsed and died outside his home in 2012, was due to give evidence in a case which implicated Russian tax officials

John Holt, centre, teaches the craft of dry-stone walling

The time-pressed urbanites swapping suits for masonry and learning dry-stone walling

It’s not just farmers who value these vital walls - Cahal Milmo reports on a London scheme to keep the craft going

This young man made his feelings clear before entering a meeting of the No-Conscription Fellowship in April 1916

Conscientious objectors: A century on, the courage of the First World War 'conchies' is recognised

A new digital archive records their experiences and the punishment they suffered for their principles

The Prince of Wales visiting a primary school last year

Prince Charles 'black spider' memos: Future King lobbied successive Education Secretaries with his 'old-fashioned views'

The Prince expressed his mistrust on 'fashionable' teaching techniques

Not backwards in being forwards: Prince Charles

Prince Charles 'black spider' memos indicate Prince could have influenced government policy over alternative medicine

Charles wasn't backwards about being forward on the subject

Researchers at Durham University claim that wearing a red tie makes you look 'aggressive and dominant'

Wearing a red tie makes you look 'aggressive and dominant', study claims

If you thought a 'power tie' exuded confidence it's time to think again

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine