Cahal Milmo

Cahal Milmo is the chief reporter of The Independent and has been with the paper since 2000. He was born in London and previously worked at the Press Association news agency. He has reported on assignment at home and abroad, including Rwanda, Sudan and Burkina Faso, the phone hacking scandal and the London Olympics. In his spare time he is a keen runner and cyclist, and keeps an allotment.

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Journalism students hold a banner reading in French: 'Journalism students : Solidarity' as they raise pens during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris

Charlie Hebdo vigils: Across France, hundreds of thousands gather in a show of defiant solidarity

Cahal Milmo joins Parisians in the Place de la Republique, and finds a mood approaching burning defiance

Buckingham Palace has twice issued denials that Prince Andrew slept with Virginia Roberts

Prince Andrew sex allegations: Documents about Duke of York's support for Jeffrey Epstein 'concealed' by US court

Buckingham Palace has twice issued denials that Prince Andrew slept with Virginia Roberts

The Change4Life campaign will offer parents a ‘sugar challenge’

Swap ice cream for yoghurt to reduce sugar intake, parents urged in new government campaign

Sugar has been identified as a key cause of obesity and associated diseases

The Duke of York with his accuser, Virginia Roberts, who has returned home after living in Australia

Prince Andrew: Aides step up defence amid further details of sex allegations

The Duke of York strongly denies having 'had any form of sexual contact or relationship with Virginia Roberts'

Mike Waterton was forced to deny claims that he had gone on a luxury holiday to Mexico

Mexican stand-off: boss denies gloating about holiday to sacked staff

Collapse of Kent recruitment firm Temp Network has caused upset

Travellers are locked out of Finsbury Park station, London, where they were directed to go as trains in and out of King's Cross have been cancelled

'Rip-off railway': Government accused over runaway fares for packed and aged trains

Today's rise comes after weeks of disruption to rush-hour services and chaos over Christmas

Notoriously elitist magazine Tatler selects its 'acceptable' state-run schools

Latest edition of posh people’s periodical contains list of acceptable state schools

Travellers board a Arriva Trains Wales in 2011

Room for a few up front? Probe into claims that passengers travelled in train driver's cab

Six travellers from Holyhead to Birmingham were allegedly allowed into supposedly secure area

Marsha in happier times

The mystery of Marsha Mehran: The best-selling young novelist who died a recluse in a rubbish-strewn cottage on Ireland’s west coast

Cahal Milmo tells the story of a romantic, restless spirit who struggled to find a place that she could call home

Kristin Scott Thomas has been made a dame

New Year Honours: Kristin Scott Thomas, Esther Rantzen and Joan Collins made dames

Scott Thomas likely to be playing Queen on stage at time she visits Buckingham Palace for her award

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine