Cahal Milmo

Cahal Milmo is the chief reporter of The Independent and has been with the paper since 2000. He was born in London and previously worked at the Press Association news agency. He has reported on assignment at home and abroad, including Rwanda, Sudan and Burkina Faso, the phone hacking scandal and the London Olympics. In his spare time he is a keen runner and cyclist, and keeps an allotment.

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Chapman Pincher in the sitting room of Berkshire home in 2012

Harry Chapman Pincher dead: Legendary journalist dies aged 100

The former Daily Express investigative reporter was best known for his work to expose the full extent of Soviet penetration of MI5 and MI6

Rescue workers close to the Rafah refugee camp, where the entrance to a UN school was bombed on Sunday

Gaza conflict: Foreign Office urgently investigating reports of British aid worker death

The Foreign Office was tonight investigating reports that a British aid worker was killed this weekend in Gaza while delivering medical supplies.

Israeli infantry troops check their weapons

Israel-Gaza conflict: Revealed - Britain’s 'role' in arming Israel

Evidence that weapons with components made here are being used against Gaza - ranging from weapons control and targeting systems to ammunition, drones and armoured vehicles

Yunus Rahmatullah claims he was subjected to brutal treatment by British soldiers

Pakistani man held for 10 years says he was tortured by British troops in Iraq

A Pakistani man kept in British and then American custody for a decade is suing the UK Government over allegations that he was subjected to torture, including waterboarding, by British troops.

Bernie Ecclestone claims he is a victim of blackmail

Bernie Ecclestone attempts to halt £26m German bribery trial

If found guilty of the corruption charge, Ecclestone, who denies the allegation, faces up to 10 years imprisonment

Hague court orders Russia to pay £30bn in damages to Yukos shareholders

Russia is facing a global scramble to have its assets abroad confiscated after an international court ordered it to pay nearly £30bn in damages for a ruthless campaign to destroy the defunct oil giant Yukos.

Hague court orders Russia to pay £30bn in damages to Yukos shareholders

The Hague arbitration court rules Moscow deliberately set out to bankrupt the company and acquire its assets

David Cameron's Big Society Network is being investigated by the Charity Commission

Voluntary sector suffers ‘collateral damage’ in push for David Cameron's Big Society

Funding to established charities with strong track records has dropped, while money was poured into failed Big Society Network projects

Steve Way leading the marathon, before finishing 10th, the top English runner

Steve Way: From 16st couch potato to Commonwealth Games marathon runner

Bank worker from Poole sets a new personal best for the distance of 2hr 15m 16s – beating the 35-year-old record for runners aged 40 and over

Workers in Seattle are paid 100 times as much as workers in Bangladesh

Bombsheller: The website that makes us all into top fashion designers

Seattle company lets customers create their own clothes, then click 'buy' and wait for delivery
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The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

Commons debate highlights growing cross-party consensus on softening UK drugs legislation, unchanged for 43 years
The camera is turned on tabloid editors in Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter'

Gotcha! The camera is turned on tabloid editors

Hugh Grant says Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter' documentary will highlight issues raised by Leveson
Fall of the Berlin Wall: It was thanks to Mikhail Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell

Fall of the Berlin Wall

It was thanks to Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell
Halloween 2014: What makes Ouija boards, demon dolls, and evil clowns so frightening?

What makes ouija boards and demon dolls scary?

Ouija boards, demon dolls, evil children and clowns are all classic tropes of horror, and this year’s Halloween releases feature them all. What makes them so frightening, decade after decade?
A safari in modern Britain: Rose Rouse reveals how her four-year tour of Harlesden taught her as much about the UK as it did about NW10

Rose Rouse's safari in modern Britain

Rouse decided to walk and talk with as many different people as possible in her neighbourhood of Harlesden and her experiences have been published in a new book
Welcome to my world of no smell and odd tastes: How a bike accident left one woman living with unwanted food mash-ups

'My world of no smell and odd tastes'

A head injury from a bicycle accident had the surprising effect of robbing Nell Frizzell of two of her senses

Matt Parker is proud of his square roots

The "stand-up mathematician" is using comedy nights to preach maths to big audiences
Frank Warren: Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing

Frank Warren column

Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing
Adrian Heath interview: Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room

Adrian Heath's American dream...

Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room
Simon Hart: Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manuel Pellegrini’s side are too good to fail and derby allows them to start again, says Simon Hart
Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes
Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs:

Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs

"I have never regarded anything I have done in "the media" as a proper job"