Charlotte Philby

Charlotte Philby is a writer at The Independent with a weekly column on motherhood in The Independent Magazine. She was shortlisted for the 2013 Cudlipp award for excellence in popular journalism for her undercover investigative work, and writes for various cultural magazines.

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Charlotte Philby's Parental Leave: When given respite from children, seek out a dark room

A mother's weekly dispatch from the pre-school frontline

More than half of home-workers are managers and professionals, while those least likely to work from home are in administrative and secretarial occupations

Four million people in Britain are now working from home

'Modern home-working is good for the economy as it increases productivity,' says TUC general secretary

A Syrian man shows marks of torture on his back after he was released from regime forces. Amnesty International found the use of torture to be “flourishing around the world”

The ‘24’ effect: A third of Britons think torture can be justified

Poll by Amnesty shows nearly half of British people reject the idea of a global ban on torture

While the rewards of parenthood are bountiful, they are also quiet

Mother's ruin? 'Baby brain' is simply a way of preparing women for motherhood

So, 'baby brain' is real, psychologists say. Phew, says Charlotte Philby, but along with the mind fog, nature also gave mothers masterly powers of empathy and multi-tasking

Charlotte Philby's Parental Leave: It's been this way for a few days - strange goings-on after lights out

A mother's weekly dispatch from the pre-school frontline

Charlotte Philby's Parental Leave: She can smell my weakness. 'Shall we play a game, mummy?'

A mother's weekly dispatch from the pre-school frontline

Charlotte Philby's Parental Leave: 'Is daddy your daddy?' No. 'Why?' Because he's my husband

A mother's weekly dispatch from the pre-school frontline

Charlotte Philby's Parental Leave: The smiles of strangers felt like being blown kisses

A mother's weekly dispatch from the pre-school frontline

The Farm by Tom Rob-Smith: Book review

The use of Sweden in fiction as a bleak, dislocated backdrop for murder has become so ubiquitous in recent years, with the high-profile success of writers including Henning Mankell and Jo Nesbo, that its uninhabited sand-dunes and baron skies have been at risk of losing their chill. In his new book, The Farm, Tom Rob-Smith breathes new life into the landscape, transcending the traditional crime fiction genre with an intricately-knitted thriller steeped in mythology.

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