D J Taylor

David John Taylor is a British critic, novelist and biographer.

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He's my Squeeze from suburbia

England Is Mine: pop life in Albion from Wilde to Goldie by Michael Bracewell, HarperCollins, pounds 18; Is pop music the key to a lost Arcady of Englishness? In your dreams, says D J Taylor

On his best behaviour

Journals, 1990-1992 by Anthony Powell, Heinemann, pounds 20

books: What a carve-up

A cosy Left-Liberal orthodoxy has stunted recent British fiction. D J Taylor cuts down the pinks

Protocol and culture clash

D J Taylor on tales of exile

The American way of death

This Wild Darkness: The Story of My Death by Harold Brodkey, Fourth Estate, pounds 14.99

Re-inventing Mary Anne

D J Taylor reads the life of a rebellious Victorian

Books: Cry Mother, if you will...

D J Taylor on nuns and honeymoons; Ripples of Dissent: Women's Stories of Marriage from the 1890s edited by Bridget Bennett, Dent, pounds 25

Book review / Losing your heart in the madhouse

Asylum by Patrick McGrath Viking, pounds 16

Whiskery symbol of a High Bohemian tradition

George Cruikshank's influence on Dickens and Thackeray has been hugely underestimated, says D J Taylor; George Cruikshank's Life, Times and Art Volume 2: 1835-1878 by Robert L Patten, Lutterworth Press, pounds 45

BOOK REVIEW / Fireworks, rubies and an ayah: 'East, West' - Salman Rushdie: Cape, 9.99

IN AN age where we are regularly asked to judge not only the book but the accompanying performance of the writer, the vexed issue of the relationship between art and the artist infects literary life like a kind of distemper. Some novels seem inextricably bound up with the antics of their creators. But Salman Rushdie has fallen into this category by sheer mischance. Of all the misfortunes to affect a writer, one of the most dismal must be an awareness that the simple act of picking up your pen has become a highly charged political act, open to misrepresentation by friend and enemy alike. Depressingly, the fact of Rushdie's continued existence as a writer is as much a challenge for his admirers as his detractors. After all, to criticise work by a victim of intolerance can look dangerously like abetting zealotry.
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