David Lister

A founder member of The Independent David Lister joined the paper in 1986 as Assistant Home Editor. He became the paper's arts correspondent in 1988 and is now Arts Editor and writes a column each Saturday. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

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The Salvador Dalí retrospective at the Pompidou Centre in Paris has now become the most popular exhibition in the Centre's history

Pompidou's Dali exhibition inspires artist's favourite hotel

Just look out for the lobster

Alan Bennett would make a great guest editor for the Today programme

Thank God: Maria Miller is a Culture Secretary who has actual opinions on culture

Plus: The Barbican and the Bard, together again and and eclectic audience for the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic's coffee concertos

A site that's just the ticket for beanpole theatre-lovers like me

Plus: Cirque du Soleil ticket holders are entitled to the wheel deal and what was Damian Lewis doing at dinner with Rupert Murdoch?

Thom Yorke of Radiohead during the band's legendary Glastonbury performance in 1997

Radiohead's Thom Yorke might not like David Cameron. But if music is art, and art is for all, then the singer is demeaning his own work

Plus: politicians embracing culture, and a wonderful Manet exhibition

Max Hole is right - conductors must do more

So classical music fails to attract young audiences, and it’s the fault of orchestras  – that’s the verdict of one of the most powerful people in the music business.

A scene from 'The Impossible'

PRs rejoice! The Twitter critics are here, and they love your new movie

Some will see the rise of the Twitcrits as a "democratisation", but surely that would need a few negative remarks alongside the glowing endorsements

CBBC's banishment to 'the ghetto', has deprived us all of the opportunity to find Teletubbyland

Plus: Why the unmissable return of the Thin White Duke won't require a marketing budget and a "rising star" that's long-since risen

The problem for English directors of the Scottish National Theatre

Plus: Some on-message re-branding for the British Council and Undress for Opera, possibly taken a little too literally

Bridget Jones is set to make a comeback as the chardonnay-sozzled singleton

Dear Diary, next year remind the politicians to make a date with the arts

What will 2013 bring? Plus: Bridget Jones is back, I'm still in love with 10CC and who the hell is Hilary Mantel?

Bourne again: Mari Kamata as Ardor the Fairy of Passion in Sleeping Beauty

If there's a Sports Personality of the Year, why shouldn't there be an Arts one too?

Plus: The Matthew Bourne ultimatum and let's stop hearing it for BlackBerry

Day In a Page

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice