David Randall

David Randall is a British journalist and author of The Universal Journalist, a textbook on journalism.

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David Randall: The Emperor's New Clothes (05/08/12)

Women's football has been mocked for years. But this is one game in which men are outplayed
Carole Waug, whose body was found in a lockup garage in New Malden

The secret life of Carole Waugh

Despite Libyan connection, police believe the answers to the wealthy woman's death will be found in London

David Randall: The Emperor's New Clothes (15/07/12)

Young people today! Rude, selfish, thoughtless.... But chivalry is not dead, finds our resident sexuagenarian

Job done! The world according to JT

History is littered with misunderstandings. We asked the Chelsea captain to shed some light

The Olympics... it's not like it was in the old days

Athletes carrying Colt 45s? Sprinters wearing white gloves? Beers before the marathon? The first modern Olympics, Athens 1896, were a very different proposition

Just champion: American Donald Budge, above left, gives a radio interview after his victory over Britain's Bunny Austin, right, in the 1938 Gentlemen's Singles Final

Time, Gentlemen please! It's 1938, and Bunny is the great British hope

It is Friday 1 July 1938, and we are entering the grounds of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club. In the distance, the Riviera Express can be heard sounding its whistle as it steams through Wimbledon station; while all around us there is the noisy clatter of excited crowds arriving at the club's gates. We have just stepped from a London taxi, giving the driver half-a-crown – an extravagant tip, perhaps, but we are in festive mood. This afternoon, at 10 minutes to two, Donald Budge of the United States and our own British hope, Henry "Bunny" Austin, will walk out on court to contest the final of the Gentlemen's Singles.

Canary Wharf, the financial district in the city of London

Banking scandal: Greedy, shoddy, deceitful. A modern cesspit

It was a week of truly shocking revelations. Will the banks finally be brought to book for their behaviour?

Remind me who I am again?

The Olympics minister, Hugh Robertson, got angry with London 2012 security operatives on Wednesday. He tried to get into the Games' Media Centre without his security pass and the doormen refused to admit him. Mr Robertson, whose face is more E-list than A, was annoyed, affronted even, not to be recognised. And so he demanded: "Do you know who I am?"

Drip, drip, drip

The Emperor’s New Clothes

By popular acclaim this is the worst summer's weather ever. David Randall debunks that myth

There was a time when Johnny McDermott was the young hero of American golf - then it all went terribly wrong

Tragic tale of the US Open champion of 100 years ago

This is the saddest story of a golf champion you will ever read. His name was Johnny McDermott and there was a time when he was the young hero of American golf, a slim Rory McIlroy of a specimen with a bouncing step and a whippy swing. He was the first American-born US Open champion when still a teenager, and 100 years ago he won again at the age of 20, so ending forever the long domination of the event by British-bred players. And then it all went horribly wrong. He spent almost all the last 55 years of his life in an institution, and although he could still swing a club, he could barely string a sentence together.

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Day In a Page

Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices