Dom Joly

Dom Joly has been a columnist for The Independent on Sunday and The Independent since 2001. Joly shot to fame in 2000 with his anarchic Channel 4 hidden-camera comedy programme Trigger Happy TV. He has since made television series for BBC, Five, and Sky One including, This Is Dom Joly and Dom Joly’s Happy Hour. His current TV show, Fool Britannia, is on ITV1 on Saturday nights. His spoof autobiography, Look At Me, Look At Me was published in 2004, in 2007 he brought out Letters to my Golf Club, featuring his correspondences with golf clubs around the world. In 2009 he wrote his first travel book, The Dark Tourist, in which he holidayed in some of the world’s most unlikely destinations such as Chernobyl and North Korea. His second travel book- Scary Monsters and Super Creeps, published in 2012, saw him cross the globe hunting monsters like the Yeti and Bigfoot. He is currently writing his new travel book.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

Man takes on schnitzel... and schnitzel wins

"Let's go up north for a few days…" is how my Canadian holidays invariably end up. Normally it's summer and we drive up from Toronto to Muskoka or Georgian Bay where we spend weeks mucking about on boats and lying around on sun-drenched docks. This, however, is not summer and "the north" has become a very different place. I write this ensconced in a wooden cabin five hours north of Toronto and outside it's a balmy -17C.

Woo, those crazy, heady, rock-band days

All the flags were at half-mast along the seven-hour drive from New York to the Canadian border. Occasionally, we would spot a message board outside a high school with words of support for the people of Newtown, Connecticut. It was the sole topic of conversation in the Arby's fast-food joint where we stopped for breakfast. An elderly couple next to us felt everybody should be allowed handguns, but that an AK-47 was more for Afghanistan than Main Street, USA. Our kids ignored the hot topic of the day, munched on roast-beef-and-fake-cheese buns and announced they wanted to live in America. After breakfast, we filled up at the nearby gas station, our huge family wagon costing just £38 to fill. It's a curious thing about American road trips: even the gas stations are rather exciting and glamorous, with their strange candies and never-before-seen drinks. The kids kept seeing place names that sounded similar to places on the shows they watch on loop on the Disney Channel.

There's nothing to beat a quiet night out

I have just taken my wife "up" to London for a big night out. She is a fabulous mum to our kids and puts up with me arsing around the world pretending to work while she does the real stuff. "Time to spoil her," I thought to myself.

There are rules here to stop a prank backfiring

A chill went through my bones when I heard about the sad and terrible death of nurse Jacintha Saldanha. I felt so dreadfully sorry that somebody had been made to feel so low, so distressed that they felt that the only solution might be to end their own life. Online, the lynch mobs gathered and the radio station in Australia where the two DJs worked was the target of thousands of angry e-missives demanding that the prank callers be hanged, drawn and quartered – and those were the liberal ones.

Churchill had the right idea, sartorially

I know that it's all anybody is talking about this weekend, and that I should write about something else, but I just have to have my two pennies' worth in the ongoing national debate.

The day the chickens came home to roost

I've had some unusual birthday presents over the past 45 years. There was the time a girlfriend decided to dump me on my special day and informed me in a birthday card. Basically, it was "Happy Birthday, you're chucked." Two years ago, I got a cigarette from Shaun Ryder when I was celebrating as best I could in the "Celebrity" jungle.

A half-time summary of my game of life

Last week I turned 45. That means that, best-case scenario, I'm halfway through life. That's a weird thought. My life so far has been a rather varied and extraordinary affair. I was born in Beirut and spent a charmed childhood in the hills above the Lebanese capital, making the occasional jaunt into the Syrian desert. Then came the civil war and everything changed.

I've discovered how to lose weight: fast

The problem with this amazing diet that I'm on is that it doesn't have a name. It all started during the Olympics when I was in France.

Welcome to my eight wonders of the world

I took my family to one of the Seven Wonders of the World yesterday. We drove to Chichen Itza (or chicken pizza as the locals call it), the ancient Mayan ruins that lie in the centre of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico and became a "new" Wonder in 2007. We got there early to avoid the hordes of coach parties that descend upon the place after 10am. It's certainly impressive, but I couldn't help thinking that I'd been to even more amazing places that hadn't made the New Wonders list, established by a company in Switzerland which claims to have got over 100 million votes before announcing the seven winners.

The only Brit poolside without a tattoo

I'm in Mexico hoping that the edge of Hurricane Sandy will not give us a Mischief Night visit. It looks as if we are the only area of the Caribbean that it won't throw eggs at, but I'm still wary. Anyhow, I've got other problems to deal with. Every evening, somebody sneaks into my room and leaves me a peculiar object. On the first night, it was a dog made of towels. Yesterday, it was a hybrid rabbit/Ku Klux Klan member made of towels. This evening, I found two swans … made of towels. What does it mean?

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn