Fiona Sturges

Fiona Sturges is an arts columnist, interviewer, reviewer and associate Lecturer at Southampton Solent University

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

The Week in Radio: Women rule the airwaves for International Women's Day - but men still call the tune

"High-five a woman near you right now and tell them that they're great, because they probably are," instructed presenter Gemma Cairney on Saturday morning on Radio 1 during the 39-hour female takeover. This was the day that the station elected to feature exclusively female presenters from 7pm on Friday night through to 10am on Sunday, in honour of International Women's Day.

The Week in Radio: Whooping with delight as a devoted dad fights misogyny in The Moth

The best radio, to my mind, has to do with stories. Not just the stories of the mega-famous but of ordinary mortals leading ordinary lives. Thus, I've dipped in and out of The Moth (themoth.org), a New York podcast devoted to storytelling, for several years now and although the tales told vary in mood and in content, their capacity to shine a light on our everyday lives is pretty much constant.

The Week in Radio: Uproarious Iggy Pop reveals the naked truth about Burroughs

"A warning," rumbled Iggy Pop at the start of the bananas doc Burroughs at 100, part of Radio 4's Archive on 4 series. "The following programme contains references to homosexuality, drug use, sex with aliens, violence and kitty cats. What did you expect? Hehehe."

Prince has offered a refreshing alternative to the torturous rigmarole that one must usually go through in order to see a band

Gig like a Prince: why more musicians need to go guerrilla

Lovers of live music will have sensed a magic in the air lately, a purple-hued sparkle that has cut through the clouds over the capital and made gig-going a vital, spontaneous experience again.

The Week in Radio: Chris Evans on an all-time high but he's still a turn-off

In the past week I have learned that quite a few people listen to the radio. More than a few actually. It appears that more people listen to the radio than do other basic, everyday things such eat cheese or dye their hair or own a dog.

Book review: Romany And Tom by Ben Watt

There comes a point in all our lives when, like it or not, we must finally grow up. It might be when we first leave home and get a job, or when we have children of our own. For some, however, real adulthood only arrives when their elderly parents begin to view them as the grown-ups in the equation, figures to be leant on and deferred to.

The week in radio: Radio 4's walk on Iceland's wild side isn't full of the joy of nature

Nature? I don't see a lot of it these days, at least not beyond the sad pot plant in my bathroom and the seagulls that drag bits of old rubbish on to my roof under the pretext of building a nest. I grew up surrounded by nature in the depths of the West Country and, after a childhood spent literally up to my elbows in sheep, I can safely say I've had my fill.

The Week in Radio: Jazz man Soweto Kinch's city tour captured Birmingham's inner beauty

A documentary on Birmingham? Thanks but no thanks, I thought to myself while pondering the new series of Reimagining the City. Seriously, Birmingham? It's hardly Florence or Cairo or Cape Town. No one nudges their partner on a soggy January morning and says wistfully, "Darling, wouldn't it be just lovely if we could leave all this behind and disappear to Birmingham?"

The Week in Radio: American podcast The Complete Guide to Everything is banal...and brilliant

There comes a point, usually in the dead of winter, when one is forced to look further afield for one's listening, preferably to a place where the presenters don't sound as though they have lost the will to live or, conversely, as if they are trying to batter you to death with their joie de vivre.

Grime pays: He has a pension and worries about his mum - meet the ever-so sensible Tinie Tempah

But, Fiona Sturges asks the British rapper, what's with all the mucky lyrics on the new album?

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz