Fiona Sturges

Fiona Sturges is an arts columnist, interviewer, reviewer and associate Lecturer at Southampton Solent University

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The Week in Radio: Wonder woman Carol Kaye made a big hit in a man's world

When a documentary is introduced by its presenter as "one of the least known names in musical history", you might wonder if there is a good reason for this. Some people just don't have it so why pretend that they do? But it turns out the session musician and member of the fabled Wrecking Crew Carol Kaye not only had it, she had it to burn.

'Pippi Longstocking meets Barbarella': The Slits' Viv Albertine

The Week in Radio: Art historian Janina Ramirez proved that a painting can come to life on air even if you can't see it

Some subjects inevitably fall flat on radio. Nature can be a struggle – if the critter in question can't croak or coo engagingly into a microphone then, really, who cares? Cooking is far worse. It should be one of the Ten Commandments for broadcasters everywhere: Thou Shalt Not Fry, Bake or Chargrill On Air. Seriously, Woman's Hour, I love what you do, but unless you are prepared to courier one of those "perfect tapas" dishes directly to my doorstep then I don't want to know.

Kaiser Chiefs perform at The Great Escape

The Handsome Family: A marriage made in gothic

Alt-country couple The Handsome Family are making waves thanks to a certain hit HBO drama

The Week in Radio: Why The Bugle blows away the BBC's tired take on satire

I've made no secret of my struggles with radio comedy. I've searched long and hard for a BBC show that would make me crack a smile but to little avail.

Book review: Everyday Sexism By Laura Bates

Two years ago, journalist Laura Bates set up a website to log the sexist abuse she received on an almost daily basis and invited others to do the same. In a climate in which many believe sexism no longer exists, she wanted to assess the scale of a problem about which the majority of women stay silent.

The Week in Radio: BBC has paid tribute to Britpop but Cool Britannia is all a bit of a blur

"We'd heard it all before, done better," groaned the former music journalist James Delingpole to Radio 2's Jeremy Vine, referring to Blur and Oasis' respective love of The Kinks and The Beatles. The listeners were more generous. Dan in Cornwall admitted to shedding a tear at Suede's "Animal Nitrate" while David in London praised Britpop's celebration of the regional. Everyone seemed to agree that Northern Uproar were an abomination.

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Day In a Page

'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk