Fiona Sturges

Fiona Sturges is an arts columnist, interviewer, reviewer and associate Lecturer at Southampton Solent University

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Radio 4's The Grace of Jeff Buckley: Poignant memories of rock idol who spawned monsters

If you gave me a quid for every wet-behind-the-ears, acoustic guitar-wielding nitwit claiming Jeff Buckley as their musical hero, I could have built my own recording empire by now.

Radio 1's Stories slot ups its game with politically and socially charged documentaries

Back in the middle ages, Radio 1 documentaries used to be disaster zones, full of thirtysomething men talking down to teenagers while said teenagers sat heaving with embarrassment. You hoped that sometime before the end, Chris Morris would finally reveal himself and the presenters would leave silently to collect their P45s.

Chrissie Hynde and John McEnroe serve up a treat on Iggy Pop's 6Music slot

There are times on the radio when a solo voice just doesn't cut it. Listening to presenters in the early-morning slots, you get a sense of distressed souls babbling into the void while doing their utmost to muzzle their feelings of isolation. "Help! Is there anyone out there?" they seem to cry out as, locked in their soundproofed prisons, they read out the 158th text from a truck driver from Rhyl.

Nate DiMeo's The Memory Palace podcasts: Mournful yet mesmerising four-minute wonders

If, as a dedicated radio listener, you haven't heard The Memory Palace podcast (thememorypalace.us), the three-to-four-minute snippets of history beamed from Los Angeles, then your life isn't what it could be. I would even go so far as to say you are letting yourself down.

Benedict Cumberbatch is facing stiff competition from Tom Hardy for the role of Doctor Strange

Benedict Cumberbatch's poshness with pathos strikes the right note on Radio 4's Today

The actor's Today cameo was a brilliant touch, writes Fiona Sturges

James Lavelle interview: The man from UNKLE

He shaped 90s dance music - and now James Lavelle’s calling the shots again as curator of this year’s Meltdown

The Week in Radio: Wonder woman Carol Kaye made a big hit in a man's world

When a documentary is introduced by its presenter as "one of the least known names in musical history", you might wonder if there is a good reason for this. Some people just don't have it so why pretend that they do? But it turns out the session musician and member of the fabled Wrecking Crew Carol Kaye not only had it, she had it to burn.

'Pippi Longstocking meets Barbarella': The Slits' Viv Albertine

The Week in Radio: Art historian Janina Ramirez proved that a painting can come to life on air even if you can't see it

Some subjects inevitably fall flat on radio. Nature can be a struggle – if the critter in question can't croak or coo engagingly into a microphone then, really, who cares? Cooking is far worse. It should be one of the Ten Commandments for broadcasters everywhere: Thou Shalt Not Fry, Bake or Chargrill On Air. Seriously, Woman's Hour, I love what you do, but unless you are prepared to courier one of those "perfect tapas" dishes directly to my doorstep then I don't want to know.

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine