Guy Adams

Guy Adams was The Independent's Los Angeles correspondent from 2008-2012.

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Stilted: Despite an all-star cast and a carefully choreographed event, Romney’s chances look slim

Super-size Romney rally makes final bid for Ohio

Candidate woos fiercely fought state, but polls are against him

Judi Shekoni: From EastEnders to Twilight

The actress has struggled to crack Hollywood, so she’s thrilled to have finally got her big break in the new Twilight film, she tells Guy Adams

An election race that hinges on the state of America’s economy was dominated by the release of new employment figures yesterday which allowed both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney to lay a final claim to the eagerly contested mantle of job-creator-in-chief

Payroll figures give Mitt Romney last chance to make his pitch

But mixed messages from vital figures also hand Barack Obama a way to defend his record

Don Winslow photographed at The Saddle Bar, Solana Beach, California

His dark materials: Don Winslow makes the transition from cult author to household name

He's the crime writer who captures the seedy underbelly of California – and Hollywood's current go-to author. Guy Adams spends the day with Don Winslow.

Team Romney prepares for power and patronage

Romney has promised to do two things on his first day in office – and there are plenty of jobs to fill

Oakland police chief Howard Jordan

Email spam filter could cost Oakland police chief his job

Abuse messages were news to him after he blocked all comments about Occupy unrest

George Lucas and Mickey Mouse

How fat cats killed off Mickey Mouse

Disney is said to have overpaid for Lucasfilm's Star Wars but the money's not at the box office any more

Walt Disney president and CEO Bob Iger with George Lucas, right, in Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park

Hollywood's empire strikes back: Disney buys Lucasfilm, maker of Stars Wars, for $4bn

Fans can look forward to Episode 7 in the sci-fi franchise with George Lucas as consultant

With standing water across the country cholera cases are rising

Haiti fears cholera and food shortages will raise storm's death toll

The government of Haiti has warned that Hurricane Sandy represents a "disaster of major proportions," which could bring food shortages as well as an imminent spike in the number of life-threatening cholera cases.

Boy 'thought he was right' to shoot neo-Nazi father

A ten-year-old boy who used a snub-nosed revolver to shoot his neo-Nazi father in the head "thought that what he was doing was right," and therefore "cannot be held responsible" for the crime of murder, his attorneys have claimed.

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine