Harriet O'Brien

Harriet O’Brien is a travel writer and award-winning author. Her first book Forgotten Land, a rediscovery of Burma was published just before she joined The Independent, her second Queen Emma and Vikings, a few years after she left. She was on staff at The Independent during the 1990s and subsequently worked in Canada and then as managing editor at Conde Nast Traveller before going freelance in order to travel more. She mainly covers the UK, Europe and Asia, where she grew up.

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Worldwide: 48 hours in ... Dublin

There's more to Ireland's capital than literary day-trippers and Guinness-necking stag nights, And late autumn is an ideal time to go, says Harriet O'Brien

A Burmese lady not for turning; AUNG SAN SUU KYI

The Saturday Profile

Travel: Isle of pilgrims and martyrs

St Ninian began it all. For centuries pilgrims made their way to the Isle of Whithorn in south-west Scotland. Now the area is hoping to attract a new type of visitor.

Two wings and a prayer

Harriet O'Brien joined some white-knuckled passengers facing phobia on a Virgin Atlantic non-flight

Britain: 48 hours in Brighton

You need a break - and a short-cut - to the soul of a city. Each week, `The Independent' provides a prescription for the perfect weekend break. This week, Brighton, where Harriet O'Brien spends 48 hours

In the land of orchids

A day trip to a tropical rainforest? It's easy if you go to Kew, as Harriet O'Brien found out when she talked to the Palmer family

Travel '98: February Morocco

Once Ramadan is over, head into old Marrakesh for a steam bath and a cool walk through an Art-Deco garden owned by Yves Saint Laurent, says Harriet O'Brien

New Year's day of the dead

A strange, haunting culture; a boldly beautiful island - but, writes Harriet O'Brien, these were not the only ingredients that made New Year in Sulawesi so striking.

Red channel

The wise traveller will heed the advice of those who have gone before, particularly those who write guidebooks to unfamiliar destinations. But in some cases the danger is that you will be deterred from enjoying a country to the full if the risks are overstated. This, I found, was the case with the section on women travellers in the current edition of Lonely Planet's guide to Morocco.

High society

The Berber tribes of Morocco's Atlas Mountains have conjured verdant valleys out of a stark and spectacular landscape. So when you find such oases of greenery, you may think you're in a close approximation to paradise. But, says Harriet O'Brien, watch out for the company you are with.
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