Janet Street-Porter

A former editor of The Independent on Sunday, Janet Street-Porter is now the paper’s editor-at-large. As a journalist and broadcaster she has had an innovative and groundbreaking career in television, creating programmes for the BBC, Channel 4 and LWT, for which she has won a Bafta and the Prix Italia. She is also vice president of the Rambler’s Association.

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Janet Street-Porter: 'Viva Forever!' buzzes along, the songs sungbetter than first time around

A pinch of Spice peps us all up

'Viva Forever!' buzzes along, the songs sung better than first time around

Google paid HMRC only £6m on a turnover of £395m last year

Google, Amazon, Vodafone and Starbucks might not be breaking laws. But they deserve to be punished

Our writer says one way to make them pay is through consumer boycotts

Janet Street-Porter: 'I'm all for free choice, and the right to live your life with the minimum of governmental intervention, but when it comes to booze, a large number of us lack the 'sensible' gene.'

Raise booze prices to save lives

By nature I'm a libertarian – give me a set of rules and regulations and my gut instinct is to ignore or work round them. When the Government launched the daft "five-a-day" fruit and veg campaign, I mocked from the sidelines, and was vindicated when research revealed that the advice was ignored. We now eat less veg than before all that money was wasted. Our cannabis laws are ludicrous, and the sooner soft drugs are legalised the better. It would save precious hours of police time and thousands of pounds in pointless prosecutions. Given that, why do I support David Cameron's determination to enforce a minimum price for alcohol? I should side with those who say that a hike in prices will also hit sensible drinkers and penalise those who can't afford it.

Get the BBC back to basics, Tony

As the BBC's new Director-General, Tony Hall's first duty is to take the Corporation back to basics

If the BBC is to retain the public's confidence, it has to provide a service that the market cannot. Can we say for sure it is doing that at the moment?

Chairman of the BBC Trust, Chris Patten

Back to basics for the BBC

Why not start at the very beginning, just like Maria in The Sound of Music? Let's focus on the letter A, and the gaping hole at the centre of the Newsnight/McAlpine/BBC/This Morning/Twitter debacle that can be summed up in one word – accountability, or, rather, the lack of it.

George Galloway was mocked for appearing on Big Brother in a silly catsuit, but he emerged a household name and was re-elected as an MP

Politicians beware! It's live TV

Television can make or break a politician – the three US presidential campaign debates achieved huge viewing figures of up to 67 million. Each day, the candidates used carefully staged rallies and personal visits to reach a wider audience watching at home, in the office, on their mobiles.

Janet Street-Porter was honoured to make a 'best woman' speech at the union between Elton John and David Furnish

Why The Pink List is a cut above

Are lists important? As editor of this newspaper in 2000, I thought gay people faced discrimination, in all sorts of subtle ways. I started The Pink List to celebrate the huge contribution they make to every aspect of modern life, determined it shouldn't just be a list of arty, media types, but include as wide a range of professions as possible. Since then, so much has changed – civil partnerships have been enshrined in law and I was honoured to make a "best woman" speech at the union between Elton John and David Furnish. Gay marriage is the next milestone on the road to true equality, which leads to the question: are lists still a good way to measure achievement and lobby for change?

Janet Street-Porter: 'For the chairman, Lord Patten (pictured), to attempt to smooth things over by claiming Entwistle was in the job only 11 days when he was “engulfed by a tsunami of filth” just made matters worse.'

The BBC's mismanagement of the Savile crisis makes it even harder to defend

It seems like in the BBC the higher you claw your way up, the less you have to interact with the people making the stuff that drives the whole operation

Janet Street-Porter: 'I never felt much in common with the feminist contemporaries of Germaine Greer (pictured) – they seemed strident and aggressive'

Stuck on the long road to equality

Has feminism had its day? The vast majority responding to a survey on the Netmums website saw the term as old-fashioned, not relevant to their lives. Older women felt less strongly. I take these findings with a pinch of salt, because they are strongly weighted in favour of mums, but they did make me think. Feminism is part of my DNA. It colours how I react to social situations, political decisions. I never felt much in common with the feminist contemporaries of Germaine Greer – they seemed strident and aggressive – although I was working in a very macho environment in the media in the Seventies. I found that a dollop of humour got you a very long way. Inside, though, I never compromised, and the moment I could, I promoted and championed women.

Janet Street-Porter: 'those under 18 have no way of registering their opinions at the ballot box and perhaps influencing their fate'

A vote at 16 would pep up politics

Vote for the Tories and Cameron promises they will help us to achieve our full potential. Vote Labour and you're signing up to an all-inclusive Britain. But what if you're not allowed to vote? In spite of their grandstanding and grovelling for maximum media coverage over the past few weeks, our party leaders chose to ignore one sizeable section of society as they set our their vision for the future – the young. A million 16- to 24-year-olds are unemployed and not in further education, but those under 18 have no way of registering their opinions at the ballot box and perhaps influencing their fate.

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