Janet Street-Porter

A former editor of The Independent on Sunday, Janet Street-Porter is now the paper’s editor-at-large. As a journalist and broadcaster she has had an innovative and groundbreaking career in television, creating programmes for the BBC, Channel 4 and LWT, for which she has won a Bafta and the Prix Italia. She is also vice president of the Rambler’s Association.

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'In the South Pacific, Kate will have a hairdresser, a private jet, and tiaras to dazzle the natives'

Editor-At-Large: Frankie Boyle is not daring, he's just dull

Do disabled people want or need Frankie Boyle to make jokes on their behalf? On Twitter, the comedian commented "Nobody thinks it's a good thing to laugh at the disabled. But it is a genuine problem that we're not allowed to laugh with the disabled." That might well be true, and Frankie Boyle has more than 900,000 followers – indicating that a large number of people are interested in what he has to say, no matter how offensive his views might be to some.

Editor-At-Large: Better a quick death than a painful life

Tony Scott was a lovely bloke in a town full of creeps, and generous to his crews

Editor-At-Large: B is for Boris – and other rude words

Boris Johnson wasn't part of the team that won London the Olympics, but the past few weeks have clearly gone to his head. He imagines he's been the host of a successful global event whereas the reality is that he was only one of many bigwigs basking in reflected glory. In an interview last week, Boris moaned that David Cameron was "pussyfooting around" on the economy and complained that his own Big Idea – a proposal for a vast, polluting new airport in the Thames estuary – isn't being taken seriously by the Government. He implied that he is thinking of going back into Parliament when his term as mayor ends, which definitely means he has designs on the party leadership.

Editor-At-Large: Let's turn our neets into spads

Twenty years ago, only 20 MPs had never worked outside politics. Today that figure has leapt to 90. The kind of people who seek election has changed, too – a new study by the House of Commons found that back in 1979 nearly 100 MPs had done manual work in a previous life.

Editor-At-Large: Charities should just say no

Using their unearned wealth to back worthy causes made the Rausings feel useful

Editor-At-Large: My recipe for health – and it's free

How can something as fundamental as providing children with lunch be a political issue? Michael Gove has decided to recruit the founders of Leon, a restaurant chain, to produce a report into school meals. Talk about reinventing the wheel. Education ministers have such giant egos they imagine that only they will come up with a miracle solution that all previous incumbents in the job have failed to spot. Why will these Leon fellows do any better than Jamie Oliver, who, back in 2008, led a passionate campaign to ban turkey twizzlers and other mucky fast foods, set up schemes to train staff to cook as opposed to reheat food, and who encouraged Labour to set minimum nutritional standards?

Editor-At-Large: Agassi's tennis boot camp woes

This year, Ascot introduced a dress code, but Henley and Wimbledon have a long history of ruthlessly enforcing arcane standards of dress. Last year I fell foul of the rules at Wimbledon by daring to wear a new pink pair of canvas shoes to the members' dining room. An official told me they were "sports shoes" and were on the banned list of clothing. This year, I took no chances and queued with the public for my baguette and sauvignon blanc. Between matches, I spent an hour sparring with Richard Bacon on Five Live, and we touched on Andre Agassi's painfully honest autobiography, Open.

Editor-At-Large: Teach our kids a useful trade or two

Easily the most unpleasant experience of my teenage years was sitting in a room with a sheet of questions that had to be answered in a set time.

Janet Street-Porter: 'Where is Damien Hirst, the world's most successful artist, in Mr Boyle's weirdly retro vision? There's a lie at the centre of this extravaganza'

Editor-At-Large: Fake Britain at the heart of Olympics

I love the British countryside and spend every minute I can walking in it in all weathers, so it's encouraging that Simon Jenkins, chairman of the National Trust, thinks huge swathes should be listed in order to ensure it receives the same protection as wonderful buildings.

Editor-At-Large: Ed's idea of England has lost its way

The 'make-do and mend' spirit that got us through the last war is truly English

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Day In a Page

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We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home