Janet Street-Porter

A former editor of The Independent on Sunday, Janet Street-Porter is now the paper’s editor-at-large. As a journalist and broadcaster she has had an innovative and groundbreaking career in television, creating programmes for the BBC, Channel 4 and LWT, for which she has won a Bafta and the Prix Italia. She is also vice president of the Rambler’s Association.

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In the areas where free meals have been piloted, pupils have been, on average, two months ahead in their work.

Free school meals are a no-brainer

More than two years ago I begged the Government to make school dinners compulsory for all and to ban packed lunches. Since 2008, I've been urging politicians to make cookery compulsory in primary schools and to involve children in the preparation and serving of food as a way of teaching them social skills. There has been a television series and a huge campaign by Jamie Oliver, as well as a review of school dinners conducted by Henry Dimbleby and co.

In most of Europe, children enter formal schooling at six and in some Baltic countries at seven

Kids need time more than tests

UK is slipping down the academic achievement tables in maths, science and reading, compared with countries where kids have two more years’ play than ours

A mammogram is a horrible way to torture women to find out if they have breast cancer

Women die for lack of better drugs

A mammogram is a horrible way to torture women to find out if they have breast cancer. Your bosom is grabbed by a nurse and then pushed between two cold sheets of metal and squashed flat. A medieval form of torture that is humiliating, painful and not even reliable: many of us also have to have an ultrasound scan, if our breast tissue is dense. Mammograms must be read by someone who knows what they are doing, who can decode all the fog. Many women will pay hundreds of pounds to have their scans read by private specialists – that's what fear of cancer does.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby

The Church's grey men are out of touch

Repent isn't a word we use much. It's not as fashionable as "sorry", that devalued bit of emotional sticking plaster trotted out by everyone from Tony Blair to David Cameron when they want to win a few electoral brownie points. Repentance suggests that a sin has been committed in the first place, not an act of aggression like a war waged on a lie that can be tidied away with an elaborate apology. The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev Justin Welby, is a verbose fellow who likes to air his thoughts on a daily basis. He's not a neat and tidy spiritual leader, more an unfocused work in progress. Should a beleaguered church with a declining membership in the UK be led by a chap who publicly says he's thinking through divisive issues like same-sex marriage? Or should he man up, be brave, and offer unequivocal spiritual guidance even though it risks losing traditional members?

'If teenagers leave school unable to complete decent CVs or dress appropriately for an interview and are inarticulate and unmotivated, then the blame must be shared between their parents and teachers'

Joblessness begins with bad bosses

I don't accept that the reason why 1.09 million young people are unemployed is because they are lazy and unfocused

Joan Edwards

My will can fix political funding

Traditional political parties are an anachronism, organisations which are dying a slow but predictable death as we increasingly realise that they have little to offer

Janet on the set of Celebrity MasterChef

Fine dining is only for fusspots

I'm a decent cook but my presentation tends towards the homely rather than the faux-artistic

David Collins 'created interiors that immediately looked like they’d been around for years'

Goodbye, to architect and designer David Collins

The architect and designer David Collins, who has just died after a shockingly short illness, was a good friend I didn’t see nearly enough. But every time I went to dinner at any of my favourite restaurants, I was reminded why he was a genius.

What's so bad about making a commitment to someone?

What's so wrong with marriage?

I would like to see it rebranded, because children whose parents live together may suffer when relationships break down

'I won't be putting a timer on my shower until the Energy Saving Trust saves us money by putting itself into liquidation'

Pouring our cash down the plughole

I won't be putting a timer on my shower until the Energy Saving Trust saves us money by putting itself into liquidation

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Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
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Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
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China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
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Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before