Janet Street-Porter

A former editor of The Independent on Sunday, Janet Street-Porter is now the paper’s editor-at-large. As a journalist and broadcaster she has had an innovative and groundbreaking career in television, creating programmes for the BBC, Channel 4 and LWT, for which she has won a Bafta and the Prix Italia. She is also vice president of the Rambler’s Association.

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Tony Hall, the new director-general, has ordered pay-offs to be capped at £150,000 from September, but he hasn’t said whether confidentiality clauses will continue

The public's money pays for silence

The BBC has spent £28m in the last eight years ensuring that people who leave will not speak out

The Government is trying to prevent whistleblower Edward Snowden from travelling to this country

The home of free speech closes down for NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden

If you care about privacy, try self-censorship

Margate did not need Mary Portas – it got funds for a gallery that attracts local people and visitors

More towns should do a Margate

The seaside resort did not need Mary Portas - it got funds for a gallery that attracts local people and visitors

Brave Ingrid engaged a man holding a meat cleaver in conversation until police arrived

The bravery of women shames men

Ingrid Loyau-Kennett engaged a man holding a meat cleaver in conversation until police arrived

Huhne’s ex-wife Vicky Pryce was released after serving two months and is writing a book entitled Prisonomics, focusing on how the prison system treats women

Eight weeks in prison does not make Chris Huhne and Vicky Pryce instant experts

Huhne can't come up with any magic solutions for helping prisoners

Sheryl Sandberg says that if there was true equality, from the division of labour in the home right up to the boardroom, then society would operate more efficiently

Cheaper childcare is the only way

Childcare minister Liz Truss hopes childminders will reduce their costs - but she can't guarantee it

Tory MP Dr Sarah Wollaston has kept up a steady stream of criticism of her white, male bosses ever since she arrived

Let's have more Tories like Sarah Wollaston

David Cameron has to start to listen to mouthy women like Dr Sarah Wollaston MP

Energy giant NPower admited it hasn’t paid corporation tax in the UK for three years

Who will close the tax loopholes?

The Prime Minister wants EU leaders to unite against global companies who evade tax, and says the G8 Summit, to be held in Northern Ireland in June, will mark a "turning point" in his campaign. Few voters would disagree with his intentions, especially married couples. Research carried out by the Christian charity Care recently indicated that a married couple with two children, where one parents works, will be paying 42 per cent more in tax in Britain than in comparable economies. The Chancellor regularly promises tax breaks for married couples, but they seem as unlikely as Mr Cameron's dream of wringing billions from corporate tax evaders.

Janet Street-Porter: Giles Fraser made a fool of himself, opining that the church should not have hosted the funeral because the building symbolises national unity, not discord

For once, we were all in it together

Baroness Thatcher's funeral united people who normally loathe each other

Psy is managed by the same people as Justin Bieber

Being a pop star is no job for dolts

While North Korea threatens war, the South offers the world a chance to party. Psy released "Gentleman", his long-awaited follow-up to "Gangnam Style" at midnight on Thursday in 119 countries, and performed it for the first time in concert in Seoul yesterday. Check out his new dance moves on page 5. These days, the chubby South Korean popster is managed by the same people as Justin Bieber, so is his follow-up a sell-out? Psy's "Gangnam" video racked up a whopping 1.5 billion hits on YouTube, the most-watched video in the history of the internet. That makes him a cultural phenomenon, well worth an in-depth analysis by Mr Imagine, Alan Yentob. Sneer not, Psy and his bonkers dancing have made a lot of people very happy – not a lot of popular music crosses this many frontiers. Which must be why the Today programme took a break from analysing Baroness Thatcher's legacy, and the parlous state of banking in the EU, to debate one-hit wonders last Friday morning.

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The super-rich now live in their own Elysium - they breathe better air, and eat better food, when they're not making beans on toast for their kids

The super-rich now live in their own Elysium

They breathe better air, eat better food, take better medicine
A generation of dropouts failed by colleges

Dropout generation failed by colleges

£800m a year wasted on students who quit courses before they graduate
Entering civilian life 'can be like going into the jungle' for returning soldiers

Homeless Veterans appeal

Entering civilian life can be like going into the jungle
Sam Taylor-Johnson: Woman on top

Sam Taylor-Johnson: Woman on top

Fifty Shades of Grey director on bringing the hit to the screen
Shazam! Story of the $1bn 'what's that song?' app

Shazam: Story of the $1bn 'what's that song?' app

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch