Joan Smith

Known for her human rights activism and writing on subjects such as atheism and feminism, Joan Smith is a columnist, critic and novelist. An Honorary Associate of the National Secular Society and a regular contributor to BBC radio, she has written five detective novels, two of which have been filmed by the BBC.

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The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby

Our zombie church has a new leader. So what?

As events go, it's not exactly earth-shaking. A couple of days ago, a pressure group announced the name of its new boss, a white bloke in his 50s who used to work in the oil industry.

Is £624 the price of a rape victim's anonymity?

Some friends and supporters of Ched Evans wrote the name of the woman he raped on Twitter - all they got was a measly fine.

You can't run a fair society from the Gents'

David Cameron has nothing against women, I imagine, in the right place. He's married to one, and he's got a couple of daughters, although he did once leave one of them behind in a pub. I don't suppose he gives much thought to the other women in his life – or rather their absence. He is leader of a political party which has woefully few women MPs, he has a poor record of promoting women to Cabinet and he's notorious for patronising Labour women during Prime Minister's Questions. Remember when he told a Shadow Cabinet minister, Angela Eagle, to "calm down, dear"?

Dave picks a Euro-fight, and society is the loser

It's so obvious it shouldn't need saying: all prisoners are not the same. Some are in jail because they've committed motoring offences or fraud, and they're hardly in the same league as serial killers and rapists. That's why the criminal justice system has different categories of prisons, from open prisons to high-security establishments, and I've never heard anyone argue that all inmates should be treated exactly the same. That, though, is the Prime Minister's assumption when it comes to the question of prisoner voting, which he got on his high horse about last week.

Why won't Leveson ask to see Dave's emails?

I don't suppose David Cameron is looking forward to the publication of Lord Justice Leveson's report on the press next month. The Prime Minister squirmed through an uncomfortable day at the inquiry in the summer, when his close friendship with the former Sun and News of the World editor, Rebekah Brooks, was revealed in a series of texts and emails. But he must have breathed a sigh of relief last week when the inquiry did not order him to hand over another cache of messages between himself and Brooks, which is said to include embarrassing exchanges.

Finally, abuse victims are being taken seriously

It's the kind of shift that happens once or twice in a lifetime. In the past few days, people who hadn't previously thought about it have suddenly realised that "a bit of harmless fun" might actually be a nasty sexual assault. About time, too: what kind of culture makes a household name out of a creepy child-abuser who didn't even hide his predilections? Jimmy Savile was knighted by Margaret Thatcher and given a Papal knighthood by John Paul II. Now he's the catalyst for a sea-change in public attitudes towards verbal harassment, unwanted touching and worse.

Predators were a grim fact of 1970s office life

It's hard to explain how normal it was - we learned ways of protecting ourselves and others without jeopardising our careers

Journalists investigating the scene of the crime on the Combe de l'Ire

Rolling news devours everything in its path

The horrific French Alps murder case was everywhere in the news, and now, we don't hear about it.

How did an ethical issue become a political one?

There is no obvious reason why so many Conservative MPs should be committed to restricting access to abortion. But they are, and there have been numerous attempts by Tory backbenchers to weaken the 1967 Abortion Act. In recent years, Nadine Dorries and Ann Winterton have been the standard-bearers in a campaign which goes back to 1977, when William Benyon introduced a Bill that would have significantly undermined the 10-year-old Act.

Clarkson, Brand, Assange: The egos have landed

If I were constructing the dinner party I'd least want to go to, the guest list would start with Jeremy Clarkson, Russell Brand and Julian Assange. Just imagine the conversation: I can already hear Clarkson complaining that you can't even make a joke about a dead prostitute these days, while Brand gestures towards his crotch and Assange looks for a balcony from which to address his people.

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Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

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David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
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Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

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A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

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He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star