Johann Hari

Johann Hari has reported from Iraq, Israel/Palestine, the Congo, the Central African Republic, Venezuela, Peru and the US, and his journalism has appeared in The New York Times, Le Monde and others.

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The Independent around the web

Johann Hari: This Budget took from the rest to give to the rich

Yesterday the process of redistribution away from you was supercharged by the Tories

Johann Hari: What I've got in common with Jamie Oliver's kids

When he watches Jamie's Dream School, the truculent, cynical students are all too familiar to Johann Hari: he spent his teenage years playing arcade games instead of studying. But, as he explains, it's possible to rekindle a love for education, if kindness is on the curriculum

Johann Hari: The myth of the panicking disaster victim

The vast majority of people behave in the aftermath as altruists, saving their fellow human beings and sharing what they have

Johann Hari: Don't allow Cameron to rebrand cuts

The only job David Cameron ever had outside politics was as a PR man for a large corporation – and now he is using the skills he learnt then to launch an act of rebranding worthy of a panicked business desperate for brand decontamination.

Johann Hari: Demanding cheaper oil is disastrous

The most popular cry in politics today is a pledge to deny reality and cut petrol prices. Give us our fix! Make it cheap! Make it now!

Johann Hari: David Cameron’s assault on the homeless is Dickensian

The Tory council believes he is "encouraged" here by the free food, I tell him. He looks down at his sandwich and asks softly: "What planet are they on?"

Johann Hari: Thatcherite chicken soup for the soul

There are many symbols of a cold, cruel streak running through Britain today – but for me, the most galling is the ascent of Paul McKenna. Yes, I know that set against David Cameron's assault on our social fabric, it seems trivial to complain that we have turned a glowering stage hypnotist into our best-selling self-help guru. But the two are symptoms of the same disease. The "advice" doled out by McKenna is pure Thatcherite chicken soup for the soul – and a recipe for more pain.

The First Decade: Has the internet brought us together or driven us apart?

Over the last 10 years, the internet has utterly transformed the world. But as we embrace this new-found connectedness, asks Johann Hari in the second of our essay series, are we losing our culture?

Johann Hari: How can we trust an army that cannot be trusted with its own?

All attempts to get a public inquiry into the Deepcut deaths have been stonewalled

The shame of the climate-change deniers

More than 10,000 reputable scientists believe in man-made global warming; seven doubt it

Day In a Page

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice