John Walsh

Prolific writer and commentator John Walsh contributes columns to the paper as well as writing features, interviews and restaurant reviews. He has been editor of The Independent Magazine, literary editor of the Sunday Times and features editor of the London Evening Standard.

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Camberwell Arms, restaurant review: Hearty and comforting food carried off with panache

A few summers ago, the weirdest pop-up restaurant in London popped up on the roof of a car park. Frank’s Café, as it was called, was the invention of the Hannah Barry Gallery in Peckham. They commissioned a temporary wooden pavilion from the architects Lettice Drake and Paloma Gormley (Antony’s daughter) to go on the roof of Peckham’s multi-storey car park, alongside a sculpture exhibition called Bold Tendencies.

It won't just be the super rich hit by a mansion tax

How will a government assess whether a house has tipped into the £2m bracket?

Iggy Pop was a punk before punk was invented but now the master revivalist is set to take a regular BBC Radio 6Music slot

The wildest of rock’s wild men, the drug fiend’s drug fiend is to be a DJ

Jones & Sons, restaurant review: You'll be more impressed by the charm than the cooking at this theatrical venue

Pitched at the cusp of Kingsland Road and Stoke Newington High Street, bounded to the south by Dalston Junction and to the west by Hackney Downs, Jones & Sons is a new eating house in a groovy part of norf-east London.

Use films to teach history? Only if kids need a lesson in historical half-truths

School children will assume Marie Antoinette wore Manolo Blahniks and Kennedy was shot by the FBI

Crying shame: Gordon Ramsay shed tears after losing two stars last year

Michelin awards: Do the stars still matter?

A French restaurant critic has leaked details of next week's Michelin awards, accusing the guide of losing the plot. But ratings are worth the foodie fallouts, says John Walsh

Crab & Lobster, restaurant review: A masterclass in comfort food

I remember being baffled by a London Transport advertisement from my teenage years, encouraging people to use buses. It appeared on hoardings and bus shelters all over the metropolis, and showed a wretched-looking couple shielding themselves from a downpour at a bus stop while, in the distance, the Number 74 (or whatever) hove into view, lights blazing and driver beaming. The message on the poster read: 'A Welcome Sight on a Dark Night!'.

A packed Westminster cathedral

The Francis Factor: Why worshippers are returning to Catholic churches

Former altar boy John Walsh explains just what it is the lapsed are returning to

You say lateral frontal pole, I say that little devil/angel that whispers in my ear

Without recognising it, Oxford scientists appear to have located the consience

Travel special 2014: Recalling murderous fun on the Orient Express

Ah, the Orient Express! What images she conjures in our minds... The gorgeous old carriages, brown-and-cream in their English incarnation, blue-and-gold for the trans-European hurtle to Venice, the train on which Hercules Poirot solves the most, shall we say, all-inclusive murder plot in all Agatha Christie's books, the setting for Graham Greene's sinister Mitteleuropean wheeler-dealers in Stamboul Train, the carriages in which James Bond wrestles to the death with his Soviet nemesis in From Russia with Love, the enduring dream of interwar, travel-bound intrigue, where romantic British chaps could find mysterious women in torn veils rapping on their couchette door at midnight, and find heftily-moustached Turkish spies passing them secret documents in the dining car...

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