John Walsh

Prolific writer and commentator John Walsh contributes columns to the paper as well as writing features, interviews and restaurant reviews. He has been editor of The Independent Magazine, literary editor of the Sunday Times and features editor of the London Evening Standard.

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Life on Mars? The imagination runs wild – and not in a good way

Small, apparently harmless things can turn into bloody great delinquent savage things

Rex & Mariano, restaurant review: Harbour-to-table is a nice concept ... but ditch the iPads

St Anne's Court, London W1. About £30 a head before drinks or service

A visitor walks past one of the displays of Elvis

Elvis comes to the UK: The King is enshrined, forever young, as Graceland arrives over here

‘Largest retrospective ever in Europe’ offers everything from his first record to gold telephone – except images of Elvis’s early decline

The flood of anger at the Irish water charge shows that tax avoidance has its merits

People are waking up to the fact the money will be used to pay off the massive national debt

Dictator's dinner: Hitler tailored his diet to cope with his chronic flatulence

Dictators' Dinners: From Hitler's vegetarianism to Kim Jong-Il's Iranian caviar

John Walsh reads up on the dos and don'ts of dining with history's great dictators

Ed Sheeran is the most listened-to act in the world

Ed Sheeran: Boy next door who made it very big

The most popular act on Spotify is a red-haired 23-year-old from Hebden Bridge who looks more like a fan than a star

Gloss finish: the lobby makes a statement

The Beaumont, London: Room service

A capital idea, this Manhattan transfer

Mikhail Kalashnikov with an AK-47

Instead of trying to rebrand the AK-47 as a 'weapon of peace', Kalashnikov should just tell the truth

If you’re one of the 250,000 people killed every year by a gun, the chances are it’s a Kalash

Phyllis Dorothy James on stage during a reading of her book 'Death Comes to Pemberley' last year

PD James appreciation: She shot from poverty to the peerage – but remained down-to-earth

Whether it was she or her friend Ruth Rendell who best deserved the title “Queen of Crime,” there was definitely something regal about PD James. She was a Baroness, she often lunched with the Queen and her books were always among the small pile of reading material sent to beguile the royal family on their holidays. She always carried herself with serene dignity. But it never, thank goodness, went to her head. She was far too down-to-earth to succumb to grandeur. She positively wriggled with embarrassment if you called her by her title. “Don’t bother with that nonsense,” she’d say. “Call me Phyllis.”

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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
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Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness