Julie Burchill

Julie Burchill, 51, has been a journalist since the age of 17. The Channel 4 drama series based on her teenage novel Sugar Rush won an International Emmy in 2006, a play about her by Tim Fountain, Julie Burchill Is Away, was an off-West End hit in 2002 and she has written sixteen books.

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Julie Burchill: Rihanna is the real thing

Keeping it real. Is there any modern phrase which so immediately makes one's Phoney Alarm go off big-time, with bells on? Sincerity has become very suspect over recent years, and with good reason – the search for authenticity has ruined more lives than crack, smack and sugar rolled together.

Julie Burchill: Self-pity is now an art form

Notebook

Julie Burchill: Jackie O and her trivial pursuits

Was there ever a bigger all-round phoney than the late Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, whose puddle-deep insights into the great (Martin Luther King), the good (Indira Gandhi) and the ghastly (her sleazebag of a husband and General de Gaulle) have just been released some 47 years after she confided to her pal Arthur Schlesinger and a trusty tape machine, soon after her husband's assassination?

Julie Burchill: Let's be clear on hate crime

Notebook

Julie Burchill: What makes a hate crime?

If you could put money on a word combo coming up empty on Google, one of the best bets would surely be "Dire Straits" and "hate crime". But apparently the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission has just amended a 15-year-old ruling that the Straits' "Money For Nothing" was unfit for broadcasting, due to three uses of the word "faggot".

Julie Burchill: Never mind the Lennox

I loathe London and visit it as little as I can. But on the the other hand, I find it hard to resist the sight of a self-deceiving tool making a spectacle of themselves. So I really do mean to make a special effort to visit the forthcoming V&A exhibition, "The House of Annie Lennox", which runs from next month until the end of February and to which admission is absolutely free. In such cash-strapped times, I foresee many a middle-class Mumsnetter using this outing in lieu of the traditional panto. It will certainly provide the usual prompts for audience debate and participation: "Annie Lennox is a hypocritical cow to criticise Rihanna for prancing around in her scanties when she regularly used to take her top off onstage back in the day!" "O no, she's not!" – "O yes, she is!" – and so on.

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