Loveday Morris

Loveday Morris is an award-winning freelance journalist currently based in Beirut and covering the unfolding crisis in Syria. She regularly contributes to the Independent

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King of Bahrain

Man who insulted the King of Bahrain on Twitter sentenced to six months in jail

A man who insulted the King of Bahrain on Twitter has been sentenced to six months in jail as the tiny island nation ramps up its crackdown on dissent amid increasingly violent protests.

Syrian rebels accused of war crime after video is posted appearing to show opposition forces shooting captured Assad troops

Video showing apparent war crime raises questions about oppposition groups

Fighting between Arab and Kurds raises spectre of escalating conflict in northern Syria

The leader of a Kurdish faction embroiled in clashes with the Syrian rebels has vowed to repel further aggravation, as fighting between Arab and Kurds raises the spectre of a new front in an increasingly multifaceted conflict.

The aftermath of a car bomb in Jaramana, southern Damascus

Air strikes and car bomb signal bloody end to Syria's failed truce

UN envoy flies to Russia in attempt to resolve worsening violence

A Hezbollah fighter in a Shia area of Beirut

Hezbollah crosses Syrian border with bloody assault on Assad's enemies

Special report: Shia fighters coming to the regime's aid have tipped the balance of power. Loveday Morris meets beleaguered rebels taking sanctuary a few kilometres from the border

Relatives of Syrian detainees who were arrested over protests against President Bashar al-Assad's government in Damascus

Syrian regime 'agrees to ceasefire for Islamic holiday'

UN-Arab League peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi's announcement that the Syrian regime has agreed to a ceasefire over the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha was met with scepticism and confusion, as questions were raised over the truce's implementation and whether rebel factions would agree to it.

Supporters of the March 14 bloc carry a wounded woman during protests on Sunday

Lebanon crisis deepens as 11 die in clashes

Lebanon's embattled Prime Minister Najib Mikati clung to power yesterday as a decision not to refer the investigation into the assassination of a security chief to an international tribunal incensed opposition MPs, deepening the political crisis.

The killing of Wissam al-Hassan highlighted the volatility of the Sunni community

Army warns nation is 'on the edge' as gun battles rage

Lebanese security forces warned that the fate of the nation is "on the edge" today as it raided militia hideouts and clashed with gunmen, after the assassination of a spy chief set off a cycle of violence underpinned by simmering sectarian tensions.

Violence erupts at funeral of murdered security chief

Lebanese protesters break through cordon and march on premier's office in Beirut

Syria is accused of dropping cluster bombs

The Syrian regime was accused yesterday of stepping up its use of cluster bombs, indiscriminate munitions that can continue to maim and kill decades after the conflict has ended.

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