Marina Lewycka

Marina Lewycka is a British novelist of Ukrainian origin.

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George Osborne's plan to rejuvenate the North of England centres on Manchester

Northern Powerhouse scheme: Does England really need a second London?

Despite the Tories' plans to create one. Marina Lewycka explains why she's sceptical

It’s parental attitudes that will help overcome the problem of lacking social mobility

I have a sentimental attachment to grammar schools. But today’s mainly benefit the middle class

We don’t have to act like John Bull to make an impact on the world stage

To make a difference we should give more to our world-class NGOs

Me, my mum and ‘Margaritka’ Thatcher

She was undoubtedly a powerful and charismatic woman, but I suspect that both my mum and Mrs Thatcher would have been appalled by the idea of a feminist icon.

Britain will use its year-long presidency of the G8 group of rich nations to push for global action against tax evasion and “aggressive” tax avoidance by wealthy individuals and businesses, Prime Minister David Cameron said today

I feel both British and European. What's so strange about that?

The tone of Cameron's oratory is that of a school bully. It’s funny, but also depressing, like twitching curtains in cramped redbrick terraces and 1950s English cuisine

Oh, no! Totnes has seen off Costa. Now I won’t be able to boycott it

Communities should have the right to go their own way, rather than being the plaything of multinational corporations.

Marina Lewycka: Casual sexism was the air we breathed. Let today's women never forget that

I marched into the post room of the office where I worked and ripped down the pin-up posters

Book Of A Lifetime: English Songs and Ballads, By TWH Crosland

After the Second World War, my family moved from a Displaced Persons camp in Schleswig-Holstein to a refugee camp in Sussex. From there we were taken in by English families. My mother worked as a domestic, and my father as an agricultural worker. Our first "host" family were the Dobbses of Whatlington. Rosalind Heyworth Dobbs (née Potter) was an artist and mother-in-law of Malcolm Muggeridge, connected through her parents and eight siblings to the Bloomsbury set. After she died in 1949, we transferred to Miss Winifred Morton in nearby Burwash Common.

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