Mark Leftly

Mark Leftly is Associate business editor for The Independent

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Russian President Vladimir Putin at the St Petersburg International Economic Forum

Lord Browne’s campaign for gay rights stops at the Kremlin

Former BP boss shocks his supporters by defending Putin’s homophobia

Weir may target rival IMI after Metso rejects £3.7bn takeover

Weir was forced to walk away from its dreams of building an engineering empire on Wednesday after its Finnish rival Metso rejected a second, £3.7bn takeover attempt.

Exclusive: Nuclear regulator the ONR accused of ‘indefensible’ conflict of interest

Britain’s nuclear watchdog faces what shocked industry insiders are calling “unbelievable” conflicts of interest, The Independent can reveal.

Big Four accountants under fire over bank audits

The Big Four accountants that so dominate the bean-counting industry have come under fire from regulators for poor quality audits of big banks and building societies.

Philip Hammond, the Defence Secretary: his department could not explain how it had underspent by £1.2bn

Critics take aim at latest scheme to outsource MoD procurement

Reforms to try to control costs may force suppliers to deal with up to four project clients

Mark Leftly: The Tories' handling of data protection undermines a key UK industry

Westminster Outlook The Tories were not happy with Jane Frost. In March, they said she had made "unfounded and baseless accusations regarding ethics" in an article in our Sunday sister title. These accusations were about the integrity of Conservative Party research, an issue that was overlooked in the build-up to yesterday's local and European elections.

Tears as Ford's saviour thanks his staff before leaving the driving seat

The man who saved Ford claimed the eyes of his British staff were "glistening" yesterday as he said farewell before retiring – even though he had made hundreds of their colleagues redundant.

Royal Mail returns the criticism to sender

Westminster Outlook Selling shares in a service of national importance was always going to have some unpredictable outcomes. Already, the Government has been accused of undervaluing Royal Mail by about £1bn when it was floated in October, prompting fierce criticism from MPs and the National Audit Office. The Business Secretary Vince Cable and the Conservative sent to keep a close watch on him, Michael Fallon, probably expected those attacks. Harder to anticipate was that they would be the victims of a reverse shareholder spring yesterday at Royal Mail's debut full-year results as a listed business.

Mike Penning
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Day In a Page

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Chosen to lead the women's wing of the ruling Zanu-PF, the wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding the 90-year old
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model of a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution