Mary Ann Sieghart

Mary Ann Sieghart has been writing about politics since the mid-1980s. After stints at the FT and Today newspaper, she joined The Economist in 1986 as Political Correspondent. In 1988, she moved to become Assistant Editor of The Times, where she spent 19 years, editing the Comment and Arts pages and writing political leaders and columns. She has presented TV programmes such as The Brains Trust and The World This Week and radio programmes such as Profile, The Week in Westminster and Newshour. As well as her Independent column, she also sits on the Council of Tate Modern, is an equity partner in The Browser website and chairs the Social Market Foundation think tank.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

Westminster is a steamy workplace where men dominate

All the ingredients conspire to give the men a sense of entitlement and the women too little power to fight back

Let more women report how the country is run

The fact that all the national papers have male political editors, and many have all-male political teams, is bound to affect the issues they cover and the politicians they rate

Cosmetic surgery is bad. That women feel the need for it is worse

The pressure to look attractive can be the worst part of being female. Now even the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons is demanding change

I used to think more cuts were the answer. But not any more

Cut less to achieve more: that's the only course after two years of failure on debt and the deficit.

Why a modern feminist like Maria Miller should look at the facts before airing her views on abortion

If medical science allows a 22-week old foetus to be viable, perhaps the abortion limit should change. In the meantime, the minister should hold back on her lifestyle advice

Can Clegg exploit the gap in the market?

The task for today is to be the voice of moderation, to appeal to the thoughtful centrist.

Nick Clegg still has time to make a gracious exit as Liberal Democrat leader - with head held high

The first Liberal leader in government since the Second World War has enacted policies dear to his party. Cable could takeover without seeming too disloyal

Mary Ann Sieghart: Women still can't have it all – but perhaps their daughters can

The 20th-century model designed for men with wives at home isn't suited to the 21st century

Mary Ann Sieghart: A referendum on Europe is coming. So why won't David Cameron take the lead on this issue?

Britain is the largest and potentially the most influential of all the non-euro members

Mary Ann Sieghart: Quality costs. The price
of 'free' journalism might be its death

Facebook, Google, and Twitter thrive by being free.

But journalism can't operate on their model

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

John Palmer: 'Goldfinger' of British crime was murdered, say police

Murder of the Brink’s-MAT mastermind

'Goldfinger' of British crime's life ended in a blaze of bullets, say police
Forget little green men - aliens will look like humans, says Cambridge University evolution expert

Forget little green men

Leading evolutionary biologist says aliens will look like humans
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: An Algerian scientist adjusts to life working in a kebab shop

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

An Algerian scientist struggles to adjust to her new life working in a Scottish kebab shop
Bodyworlds museum: Dr Gunther von Hagens has battled legal threats, Parkinson's disease, and the threat of bankruptcy

Dying dream of Doctor Death

Dr Gunther von Hagens has battled legal threats, Parkinson's disease, and the threat of bankruptcy
UK heatwave: Temperature reaches 39.8 degrees on Central Line - the sweatiest place in London

39.8 degrees recorded on Tube

There's hot (London) and too damn hot (the Underground). Simon Usborne braved the Central line to discover what its passengers suffer
Kitchens go hi-tech: From robot chefs to recipe-shopping apps, computerised cooking is coming

Computerised cooking is coming

From apps that automatically make shopping lists from your recipe books to smart ovens and robot chefs, Kevin Maney rounds up innovations to make your mouth water
Jessie Cave interview: The Harry Potter star has published a feminist collection of cartoons

Jessie Cave's feminist cartoons

The Harry Potter star tells Alice Jones how a one-night stand changed her life
Football Beyond Borders: Even the most distruptive pupils score at homework club

Education: Football Beyond Borders

Add football to an after-school homework club, and even the naughtiest boys can score
10 best barbecue books

Fire up the barbie: 10 best barbecue books

We've got Bibles to get you grilling and smoking like a true south American pro
Wimbledon 2015: Nick Bollettieri - Junk balls and chop and slice are only way 5ft 1in Kurumi Nara can live with Petra Kvitova’s power

Nick Bollettieri's Wimbledon Files

Junk balls and chop and slice are only way 5ft 1in Kurumi Nara can live with Petra Kvitova’s power
Ron Dennis exclusive: ‘This is one of the best McLaren teams ever – we are going to do it’

‘This is one of the best McLaren teams ever – we are going to do it’

Ron Dennis shrugs off a poor start to the season in an exclusive interview, and says the glory days will come back
Seifeddine Rezgui: What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?

Making of a killer

What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?
UK Heatwave: Temperatures on the tube are going to exceed the legal limit for transporting cattle

Just when you thought your commute couldn't get any worse...

Heatwave will see temperatures on the Tube exceed legal limit for transporting cattle
Exclusive - The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Swapping Bucharest for London

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Meet the man who swapped Romania for the UK in a bid to provide for his family, only to discover that the home he left behind wasn't quite what it seemed
Cheaper energy on the way, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows

Cheaper energy on the way, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows

Solar power will help bring down electricity prices over the next five years, according to a new report. But it’s cheap imports of ‘dirty power’ that will lower them the most