Mary Ann Sieghart

Mary Ann Sieghart has been writing about politics since the mid-1980s. After stints at the FT and Today newspaper, she joined The Economist in 1986 as Political Correspondent. In 1988, she moved to become Assistant Editor of The Times, where she spent 19 years, editing the Comment and Arts pages and writing political leaders and columns. She has presented TV programmes such as The Brains Trust and The World This Week and radio programmes such as Profile, The Week in Westminster and Newshour. As well as her Independent column, she also sits on the Council of Tate Modern, is an equity partner in The Browser website and chairs the Social Market Foundation think tank.

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Westminster is a steamy workplace where men dominate

All the ingredients conspire to give the men a sense of entitlement and the women too little power to fight back

Let more women report how the country is run

The fact that all the national papers have male political editors, and many have all-male political teams, is bound to affect the issues they cover and the politicians they rate

Cosmetic surgery is bad. That women feel the need for it is worse

The pressure to look attractive can be the worst part of being female. Now even the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons is demanding change

I used to think more cuts were the answer. But not any more

Cut less to achieve more: that's the only course after two years of failure on debt and the deficit.

Why a modern feminist like Maria Miller should look at the facts before airing her views on abortion

If medical science allows a 22-week old foetus to be viable, perhaps the abortion limit should change. In the meantime, the minister should hold back on her lifestyle advice

Can Clegg exploit the gap in the market?

The task for today is to be the voice of moderation, to appeal to the thoughtful centrist.

Nick Clegg still has time to make a gracious exit as Liberal Democrat leader - with head held high

The first Liberal leader in government since the Second World War has enacted policies dear to his party. Cable could takeover without seeming too disloyal

Mary Ann Sieghart: Women still can't have it all – but perhaps their daughters can

The 20th-century model designed for men with wives at home isn't suited to the 21st century

Mary Ann Sieghart: A referendum on Europe is coming. So why won't David Cameron take the lead on this issue?

Britain is the largest and potentially the most influential of all the non-euro members

Mary Ann Sieghart: Quality costs. The price
of 'free' journalism might be its death

Facebook, Google, and Twitter thrive by being free.

But journalism can't operate on their model

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Day In a Page

Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve
Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition: It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans

Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition

It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans
Besiktas vs Arsenal: Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie

Besiktas vs Arsenal

Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie
Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

As the Northern Irishman prepares for the Barclays, he finds time to appear on TV in the States, where he’s now such a global superstar that he needs no introduction
Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to Formula One

Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to F1

The 16-year-old will become the sport’s youngest-ever driver when he makes his debut for Toro Rosso next season
Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

But belated attempts to unite will be to no avail if the Sunni caliphate remains strong in Syria, says Patrick Cockburn
Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I would end up killing myself in jail'

Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I'd end up killing myself in jail'

Following last week's report on prison suicides, the former inmate asks how much progress we have made in the 50 years since the abolition of capital punishment