Mary Ann Sieghart

Mary Ann Sieghart has been writing about politics since the mid-1980s. After stints at the FT and Today newspaper, she joined The Economist in 1986 as Political Correspondent. In 1988, she moved to become Assistant Editor of The Times, where she spent 19 years, editing the Comment and Arts pages and writing political leaders and columns. She has presented TV programmes such as The Brains Trust and The World This Week and radio programmes such as Profile, The Week in Westminster and Newshour. As well as her Independent column, she also sits on the Council of Tate Modern, is an equity partner in The Browser website and chairs the Social Market Foundation think tank.

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Mary Ann Sieghart: We can't expect decisions from two parties so much at odds

Bizarrely, the best hope for resolving Coalition differences is a collapse of the eurozone

Mary Ann Sieghart: Lower house prices are just what the country needs

Ministers privately hope that prices will fall, but are terrified of saying so in public

Mary Ann Sieghart: Victims of press intrusion pay, while the perpetrators get away with it

Stolen secrets are junk food for the soul. Popular journalism can be made from less toxic materials

We don't like it, but we have to

Mary Ann Sieghart: No one likes bailing out spendthrifts – but we'll have to

We have pretty strong feelings about fairness and who is deserving and undeserving

Mary Ann Sieghart: Giving women power requires action

Companies with more diverse boards produce higher returns for shareholders

Mary Ann Sieghart: Cameron picks a fight when he doesn't need to

Let's play a game of fantasy headlines – or rather nightmare headlines. What would each party leader least like to see splashed across tomorrow's front pages? Here's a guess: "Tory war erupts over Europe", "Lib Dems break promises" and "Labour bottles out of opposition". Yet any of those three could be written about today's vote on a European referendum. And it's extraordinary that each party leader has allowed it to happen.

Mary Ann Sieghart: Cameron is paying the price for failing to keep a tighter grip on his ministers

There's nothing more dangerous for an organisation than a bullying boss. Look at RBS, where Sir Fred Goodwin bulldozed his board into a reckless takeover which led to the collapse of his bank, and much of Britain's financial system with it. Liam Fox too was a boss who was determined not to be thwarted. The story is a cautionary tale for our politics.

Mary Ann Sieghart: A PM who got his fingers burnt - by standing too far back

Liam Fox's conduct was the result of no one being willing, or able, to stand up to him

Mary Ann Sieghart: At long last, a consensus on Europe

Last week, at a fringe meeting organised by ConservativeHome, the Foreign Secretary, William Hague, took questions. He expected a barrage of Euroscepticism from this haven of the Tory right, but was asked loads about the rest of the world – Brazil, the Middle East, Asia, Africa – and only one about Europe, from a visitor who turned out to be Dutch.

Mary Ann Sieghart: They are all Eurosceptics now

The Coalition partners aren't nearly as far apart on Europe as most people believe... Power has mellowed both sides

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