Nick Clark

Nick Clark is the arts correspondent of The Independent. He joined the newspaper in June 2007, initially reporting on the stock markets. He has covered beats including the City, and technology, media and telecoms and made the switch to arts in December 2011. He has also contributed articles to the sports section.

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Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, the first man to walk in space

Alexei Leonov: First man to walk in space launches new Science Museum exhibition devoted to Russia's space programme

Director Ian Blatchford hopes the new Russian space exhibition ‘will be Science Museum’s Tutankhamun’

The alleged portrait of William Shakespeare was found in the title page of a botanical guide

William Shakespeare: Experts 'deeply unconvinced' by claims that the earliest portrait of the Bard has been discovered

Country Life's editor had called it the “literary discovery of the century”

The RHS has called on the public to turn away from gravel, paving and concrete and brighten up the front of their houses with plants, shrubbery and grass

Three times as many front gardens completely paved as a decade ago, says Royal Horticultural Society

The RHS called on householders to turn away from gravel, paving and concrete and brighten up the front of their houses with plants, shrubbery and grass

Perry opened A House for Essex in the sleepy village of Wrabness

Grayson Perry: Doors open to Turner Prize-winning artist's House for Essex

Grayson Perry’s ‘A House for Essex’ is a conceptual holiday home that he believes exposes the ‘Grand Designs’ generation as being ‘lame’

Oscar-winning British actor Eddie Redmayne went to school at Eton

Only one in 10 actors comes from working-class background, says research

The study backs up claims by stars such as David Morrissey and Judi Dench that the profession is becoming increasingly closed to the less affluent

Inside the now resurrected Regent Street Cinema

Regent Street theatre is back in the picture 120 years after original screening

London theatre where Lumière brothers first presented live film re-opens its doors

Jorge Luis Borges’ ‘The Library of Babel’ imagined endless shelves holding every possible book

Jorge Luis Borges fan brings his infinite library to life online

Jonathan Basile spent six months creating a digital version of The Library of Babel – containing all possible books with 'all possible combinations of letters'

The inscription on the back of the picture revealing Mr Khalil had been shot dead in Iraq

London art exhibition features portrait of Iraqi migrant shot dead in Iraq after being refused UK asylum

The portrait of Mr Khalil is one of three large works in pencil he created as part of a series of 12 works called 'In Limbo'

‘Far from the Madding Crowd’, which stars Carey Mulligan, is part of the bank holiday ‘madness’

British Film Institute: 'Twenty-three films released in one day? Stop the madness'

With 23 new films this weekend, the BFI says studios should move to other platforms

The burnt-out Grade I-listed Clandon Park in Surrey yesterday

National Trust mansion which appeared in Keira Knightley film now 'a shell' after devastating fire

Clandon Park stately home is famous for its magnificent marble interiors

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine