Nick Clark

Nick Clark is the arts correspondent of The Independent. He joined the newspaper in June 2007, initially reporting on the stock markets. He has covered beats including the City, and technology, media and telecoms and made the switch to arts in December 2011. He has also contributed articles to the sports section.

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The National Theatre’s ‘War Horse’ production was an unexpected success

‘War Horse’ to replace live band with miming actors

For years, audiences flocking to see War Horse in the West End have been thrilled by the music played live by a five-piece band as much as by its breathtaking puppets.

Matilda director Matthew Warchus to take over from Kevin Spacey at The Old Vic

As the glamour of Kevin Spacey’s tenure in charge of The Old Vic theatre draws to a close, he is to hand the baton not to another star but to the acclaimed director of Matilda the Musical, whose job is to “put the work on stage up in lights”.

The Braille system is used by 30,000 people worldwide

Does the digital age spell the end of Braille?

It took more than a century for Braille to be established as the English reading system for the blind after an acrimonious and lengthy dispute dubbed the “War of the Dots”.

Benedict Cumberbatch in Belstaff coat

London to host its first major Sherlock Holmes exhibition in 60 years

Sherlock Holmes, “the most famous Londoner who never lived”, is to be reclaimed for the capital in the first major exhibition about the fictional detective for 60 years.

A self-portrait by Joseph Wright of Derby

Forgotten artist of the Industrial Revolution to be reinvented

He deserves to be placed alongside Constable, Turner and the other greats, says curator

The Royal Philharmonic Society may drop the Dorchester as a venue for its music awards

Dorchester Hotel faces the music as prestigious music society joins protest over Brunei’s anti-gay laws

The Royal Philharmonic Society has held its annual awards ceremony at the London hotel for more than 20 years

Artist Grayson Perry
David Lowe of Radio Devon played a 1930s song unaware it contained the N-word
Turner Prize nominee Duncan Campbell is shortlisted for his presentation 'It Was Others'
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Day In a Page

Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor