Patrick Cockburn

Patrick Cockburn is an Irish journalist who has been a Middle East correspondent since 1979 for the Financial Times and, presently, The Independent. He was awarded Foreign Commentator of the Year at the 2013 Editorial Intelligence Comment Awards.

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Isis in Iraq: Even if Iraqi troops take back Saddam’s city of Tikrit they will face bombs and booby traps

Tikrit fell without a fight on 11 June last year when Iraqi soldiers and their commanders fled and some 800 Shia cadets taken prisoner by Isis were killed in the Camp Speicher massacre

It is feared that the numbers fleeing an impending battle for Mosul in the course of the next few months could total a million

War with Isis: Fears that looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city

'Jihadi John': Reaction to the unmasking of Emwazi confirms his PR value

The choice by Isis of 'Jihadi John' as its English-speaking executioner is to do with media impact and shows that this simple PR ploy is very effective

US air strikes have been aiding YPG fighters in cutting Isis supply lines between Syria and Iraq

Isis in Syria: Aided by US air strikes, Kurds cut terrorists' supply line linking Syria and Iraq

Now for the first time there is evidence that this military cooperation between the Syrian Kurds and the US is continuing in offensive operations

Isis failed to capture the city of Kobani

War with Isis: Militants kidnap up to 90 Assyrian Christian men, women and children from villages in north-east Syria

The jihadis may be responding to Syrian Kurdish military advances in that part of the country

Brett, right, a 28-year-old American fighting Isis as part of Dwekh Nawsha, a Assyrian Christian militia, meets a passer-by in Al-Qosh, 20 miles north of Mosul

Isis in Iraq: Assyrian Christian militia keep well-armed militants at bay - but they are running out of ammunition

An Assyrian Christian militia is trying to keep Isis at bay close to the frontline near Mosul. They are under-resourced and fighting a well-equipped enemy but still hope to return to their heartland. Patrick Cockburn reports from Bakufa

Islamic State fighters display their weaponry in the streets of Mosul, Iraq

Private donors from Gulf oil states helping to bankroll salaries of up to 100,000 Isis fighters

Exclusive: In Irbil, Patrick Cockburn hears from a Kurdish official how Gulf oil cash is shoring up the terrorists, and why this, with a divided enemy, suggests a long war ahead

Isis fighters parading in a captured Iraqi army vehicle in Mosul, which the group took in June last year

Isis: Paranoid but determined, Islamic State is ready for fight to the death in Mosul

Mobile phones are banned and punishments are draconian, yet locals enjoy certain benefits under the Islamists’ rule

Brian Williams reporting from Iraq for NBC Nightly News

It's the little lies that torpedo the news stars - as Brian Williams has found to his cost last week

World View: Embellishment and bravado are often punished more harshly than the untruths that cause wars

The experience of the British military in Basra in 2003 has led to a refusal to engage fully in the current crisis

Isis in Iraq: Britain has no plan for tackling the militants, and no idea who's in charge

A Commons report revealed last week that our involvement there is beyond parody

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Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
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