Paul Bignell

Paul Bignell is an Assistant News Editor at The Independent. He has previously been the acting News Editor of the i Paper, a home news reporter for The Independent for one year and a reporter for the Independent on Sunday for six years.

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The Independent around the web

iQuiz students have all the answers: Brightest book place in final

If there's one thing students enjoy more than a few quiet pints, it's flexing their intellectual muscles at the same time.

Tough talking: Rosi Sexton will compete before a home crowd in Manchester next month

Dr Rosi Sexton: 'Fighting is a normal part of human nature'

The maths graduate and leading mixed martial artist, describes the sport's appeal

Good neighbour: D B C Pierre lives a grounded life in Ballinamore, County Leitrim

Interview: Why little is best for DBC Pierre

The Booker winner tells Paul Bignell how he first became inspired to write his new volume of short stories

Justin Welby: The Archbishop voted against legalising gay marriage

Archbishop of Canterbury: My gay marriage view can be seen as 'akin to racism'

Justin Welby stands by decision to vote against same-sex marriage legislation

Cecil Martin, former AFL star

Footballers must do more to help young, says ex-NFL star and new Boris Johnson mentor

Premier League footballers are not doing enough to help disadvantaged young people, according to the American sportsman recruited by Boris Johnson to mentor London’s teenagers.

‘I was desperate for my team to make it’: Adventurers caught in Greenland storm tell inquest of ordeal that killed friend

Philip Goodeve-Docker died from hypothermia after team became trapped in a tent where temperatures plunged to -20C

Marin Alsop will be the first female conductor on the Royal Albert Hall podium

Marin Alsop: First Lady of the Last Night of the Proms

For the first time in 118 years, the conductor on the Royal Albert Hall podium will be a woman. It's a chance she is keen to take to promote equality. Paul Bignell meets Marin Alsop

Activists voice their opposition and set up camp, while more steadily arrive to swell numbers at the sites to around 1,000

Balcombe fracking protest widens: Second campsite opens as activists prepare to step up their campaign against shale gas exploration in Sussex

For a brief moment, it was a picture of peace. Smells of the previous night's extinguished fires mingled with fresh coffee and, despite a heavy police presence, Balcombe, the centre of a national debate over shale gas extraction, was calm yesterday.

'Industrious and thoughtful' student Ajmol Alam stabbed to death in east London street

16 year-old, who was expecting his GCSE results next week, hoped to be a doctor but those dreams were shattered when he became the eighth teenage stabbing victim in the capital this year

The training mine could help save the lives, and livelihoods, of local people who currently lose limbs to the devices

At last, a ray of hope over landmines: British designer's fake mine will train people in former conflict zones to detonate devices safely

The world's first "simulation" landmine, developed by a British designer, could reduce thousands of casualties maimed by explosive devices left behind in former conflict zones around the world.

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine