Paul Vallely

Paul Vallely is visiting professor in Public Ethics at the University of Chester and a senior research fellow at the Brooks World Poverty Institute at the University of Manchester. He writes on ethical, political and cultural issues. He has a fortnightly column in the Independent on Sunday and also writes for the New York Times and the Church Times. His latest book is Pope Francis – Untying the Knots. He was co-author of the report of the Commission for Africa and has chaired several development charities.

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Family first: According to the Health Secretary, care homes are ‘a last resort’ in Asian cultures

Politicians must share our shame over neglect of Britain's elderly

Jeremy Hunt is right. We need to tackle the neglect and loneliness of old people, but he is looking at the issue through rose-tinted glasses

Pope Francis is launching a Vatican spring-clean

This week his committee of eight cardinals began work on a radical reform of the scandal-hit Vatican

Pope Francis arrives for his general audience at St Peter's square

Pope Francis: Not so much a reformer as a revolutionary

The Vatican has been turned upside down, but can he ensure that his radical changes to the Church will last?

British households will be scrutinised as never before

Sex Box: Can TV ever take sex seriously and without titillation?

There is something inescapably voyeuristic about this piece of reality TV

Ice pick: Media reports declaring global cooling because of increased Arctic ice-cover, failed to mention the historic lows in previous years

Whatever happened to climate change?

Despite the overwhelming consensus among scientists, the media are letting politicians off the hook – and the deniers are taking advantage

Raising standards: hopes were high in the early days of the United Nations

The good, the bad and global inertia

The answer to disagreement at the UN is not to break international law but to keep looking for consensus. It's difficult, but not impossible

Accidental Death of an Anarchist

Review: Accidental Death of an Anarchist, The New Theatre, Dublin

There are two kinds of classic: those whose themes are so universal they speak to every age, and those which are a canvas on which any age can write its own story. Accidental Death of an Anarchist is the latter.

Bradley Manning, now known as Chelsea, was given 35 years in jail

Heroes and villains – a modern definition

Whistleblowers are vilified or intimidated while the wrongs and the wrongdoers that they expose go uninvestigated

Play of the week: Ciara, Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

The Traverse's festival centrepiece is a complex, rewarding dramatic monologue by David Harrower, charting the changing psychological landscape of the streets of Glasgow through the story of a gangster and his journey from ordinary decent crime to drug-dealing.

Ukip has upbraided Godfrey Bloom for his language

Bongo Bongo Land: His Excellency the Ambassador replies

After Godfrey Bloom's outburst on foreign aid, our writer is copied in on a confidential letter to David Cameron

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