Philip Hoare

Philip Hoare is a writer and cultural historian.

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Cyclists v the rest of the world – can we please call a truce?

Perhaps we could start by getting rid of the idea of a cycling ‘community’

Switched on: Derek Jarman with members of the band Psychic TV in 1983

Why Derek Jarman's life was even more influential then his films

On the 20th anniversary of Derek Jarman's death, his friend Philip Hoare reflects on his legacy

‘Swaythling Houses with Red House’ (1967)

Cutting-edge culture from the suburbs?

Yes, council estates and drain covers can be beautiful too, argues Philip Hoare as a new exhibition in Southampton demonstrates

The health of our oceans is ‘spiralling downward’, and still we act like nothing is the matter

Without drastic action, the damage will be catastrophic

Troubled waters: Brindley Sherratt and Jacques Imbrailo in 'Billy Budd' at this year's Glyndebourne Festival

When Britten's world was all at sea: How Billy Budd reflects the composer's own turbulent times

A full programme of Britten's works at the Proms culminates in a semi-staged performance of Michael Grandage's acclaimed Glyndebourne production of the story of an outsider fighting the establishment

Here comes the sun: festival-goers channelling their inner hippy

Fields of dreams with pagan roots: Before festivals became boutique, they were wild affairs

Festivals are nothing new, despite their contemporary popularity. From the extraordinary eruptions of outdoor religious revival gatherings to vegetarian, teetotal, anti-vaccinationist rallies, Philip Hoare charts their history

Museums: What is it that keeps us coming back?

So often it is absence rather than presence provides the poignancy

Five-minute memoir: Philip Hoare recalls being catapulted into a world of punk and rebellion

'I was about to be admitted to a place out of my dreams and nightmares'

Tilikum the orca performs at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida

Our treatment of orca underscores an extraordinary disconnection from the sea

As National Maritime Week opens we need to adjust our approach to these creatures

‘Sunrise with Sea Monsters’ (c1845) by J M W Turner

Out of the blue: New exhibition Aquatopia explores our relationship with the sea

From evolutionary theory to art and literature, water has shaped human development as this remarkable exhibition reveals.

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Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Sweetie, the fake 10-year-old girl designed to catch online predators, claims her first scalp

Sting to trap paedophiles may not carry weight in UK courts

Computer image of ‘Sweetie’ represented entrapment, experts say
Fukushima nuclear crisis: Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on - and may never return home

Return to Fukushima – a land they will never call home again

Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on from nuclear disaster
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?
Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals

'You need me, I don’t need you'

Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals
How to Get Away with Murder: Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama

How to Get Away with Murder

Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama
A cup of tea is every worker's right

Hard to swallow

Three hospitals in Leicester have banned their staff from drinking tea and coffee in public areas. Christopher Hirst explains why he thinks that a cuppa is every worker's right
Which animals are nearly extinct?

Which animals are nearly extinct?

Conservationists in Kenya are in mourning after the death of a white northern rhino, which has left the species with a single male. These are the other species on the brink
12 best children's shoes

Perfect for leaf-kicking: 12 best children's shoes

Find footwear perfect to keep kids' feet protected this autumn
Anderlecht vs Arsenal: Gunners' ray of light Aaron Ramsey shines again

Arsenal’s ray of light ready to shine again

Aaron Ramsey’s injury record has prompted a club investigation. For now, the midfielder is just happy to be fit to face Anderlecht in the Champions League
Comment: David Moyes' show of sensitivity thrown back in his face by former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson

Moyes’ show of sensitivity thrown back in his face... by Ferguson

Manchester United legend tramples on successor who resisted criticising his inheritance
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2015

UK city beats Vienna, Paris and New York to be ranked seventh in world’s best tourist destinations - but it's not London