Philip Hoare

Philip Hoare is a journalist and author of non-fiction books. He has been fascinated by cetaceans from an early age and his book Leviathan (2008) won the 2009 Samuel Johnson Prize.

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If I were Prime Minister: I'd clear up the shore, and make a daily skinny-dip compulsory

Our series in the run-up to the General Election – 100 days, 100 contributors, but no politicians – continues with the English professor and writer

Cyclists v the rest of the world – can we please call a truce?

Perhaps we could start by getting rid of the idea of a cycling ‘community’

Switched on: Derek Jarman with members of the band Psychic TV in 1983

Why Derek Jarman's life was even more influential then his films

On the 20th anniversary of Derek Jarman's death, his friend Philip Hoare reflects on his legacy

‘Swaythling Houses with Red House’ (1967)

Cutting-edge culture from the suburbs?

Yes, council estates and drain covers can be beautiful too, argues Philip Hoare as a new exhibition in Southampton demonstrates

The health of our oceans is ‘spiralling downward’, and still we act like nothing is the matter

Without drastic action, the damage will be catastrophic

Troubled waters: Brindley Sherratt and Jacques Imbrailo in 'Billy Budd' at this year's Glyndebourne Festival

When Britten's world was all at sea: How Billy Budd reflects the composer's own turbulent times

A full programme of Britten's works at the Proms culminates in a semi-staged performance of Michael Grandage's acclaimed Glyndebourne production of the story of an outsider fighting the establishment

Here comes the sun: festival-goers channelling their inner hippy

Fields of dreams with pagan roots: Before festivals became boutique, they were wild affairs

Festivals are nothing new, despite their contemporary popularity. From the extraordinary eruptions of outdoor religious revival gatherings to vegetarian, teetotal, anti-vaccinationist rallies, Philip Hoare charts their history

Museums: What is it that keeps us coming back?

So often it is absence rather than presence provides the poignancy

Five-minute memoir: Philip Hoare recalls being catapulted into a world of punk and rebellion

'I was about to be admitted to a place out of my dreams and nightmares'

Tilikum the orca performs at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida

Our treatment of orca underscores an extraordinary disconnection from the sea

As National Maritime Week opens we need to adjust our approach to these creatures

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