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Julian Fellowes brushes up his Shakespeare with this latest 'improvement' of Romeo and Juliet

Lord Fellowes has devoted himself to improving Shakespeare, just as the revisers of the Good News Bible helped out the authors appointed by King James.

Angel House, New Wolsey, Ipswich

Sad dads are in abundance in this drama of West Indian immigrant life in a tower block whose presiding spirit seems to be Lucifer.

Larkin With Women, Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond <!-- none onestar twostar threestar fourstar fivestar -->

Given that Philip Larkin was the poster-boy for painful solitude, many people were indignant to learn, from Andrew Motion's biography, that this "Don Juan of Hull" had three lovers and even, for several years, carried on with all of them. There's not really a contradiction, though - most men get far less sex than they want and feel they deserve; writers are just more articulate and dramatic about it. Nor is it surprising that the bald, tubby librarian was a draw for the ladies. He was clever, he was funny and he was not only a celebrity but a distinguished one. Moreover, beneath the sardonic wit was the vulnerability his lovers must have found as endearing as do the audience for Ben Brown's deft and touching play.

Visual Arts: The forgotten visual virtuoso

William Orpen Imperial War Museum London oooo9

Theatre: A cause celebre returns

Terence Rattigan's Man and Boy was considered so shocking that Laurence Olivier refused to perform it. Now it's back in the West End for the first time in 40 years.

When it's love at first bite

Inspired by US tabloid fodder, Bat Boy is a musical for nightcrawlers everywhere

Holy Terror, Duke of York's, London

Simon Gray wrote Holy Terror, he says, when he was drunk - which, if he's referring to all its versions, means he was on one hell of a bender. The play, about a ruthless publisher who has a nervous breakdown, began as Melon in 1988, then, greatly rewritten, it was produced on radio in 1989 and staged in the US in 1991 and 1992. Holy Terror, though, doesn't have the wild gaiety or lacerating rage one might expect from an extended binge: it feels as if it was created during a terrible hangover. An aura of sourness, self-hatred and ineffectuality hangs over it, and, like a real-life ranting stranger, it makes one want to tiptoe away.

The Dice House, Arts Theatre London

Cinderella, Lyric Hammersmith, London

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