Rhodri Marsden

Rhodri Marsden is the Technology Columnist for The Independent; he has also written about crumpets, Captain Beefheart, rude place names and string. He's also a musician who plays in the band Scritti Politti, and won the under-10 piano category at the 1980 Watford Music Festival by playing a piece called "Silver Trumpets" with verve and aplomb.

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Rhodri Marsden: Struggling to express your emotions? There's a sticker for that...

Nothing says "I appear to be veering towards narcissim" like a picture of a chubby cat. <b>Rhodri Marsden</b> extolls the virtues of a well-placed sticker

The world blocks its ears: The unstoppable rise of headphones and especially Beats by Dr Dre

You can’t help wonder how aliens might interpret our relationship with our headphones

Prince Charles compared the proposed extension to the National Gallery to what Webster's describes as

Rhodri Marsden's Interesting Objects: The monstrous carbuncle

* Thirty years ago this morning, Britain began its relationship with the phrase "monstrous carbuncle". The previous night, Prince Charles had delivered a speech at Hampton Court Palace to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). He seized the opportunity to compare the proposed extension to the National Gallery to what Webster's describes as "a very painful acute local inflammation of subcutaneous tissue".

Spanish lawyer Mario Costeja Gonzalez fought for six years for Google to erase a search result for his name that links to an article on property auctions

Google privacy law - analysis: The fact is, information doesn’t want to be controlled

Poor Mario Costeja Gonzalez. He’ll now forever be known as the person who owed social security debts to the Spanish government in the late 1990s. This was never his intention; indeed, he went to court in an attempt to get this detail about a past episode of his life removed from Google’s index. His victory in that case earlier this month has since prompted a huge debate about the “right to be forgotten”, but the associated publicity has provided a perfect illustration of how, as the popular slogan has it, “information wants to be free”. Attempts at suppression, whether noble or nefarious, will almost inevitably prove to be futile.

Enthusiasm curbed: irritable types such as Larry David are apparently not helping themselves

Research suggests that cynics are three times more likely to develop dementia

Committed sceptic Rhodri Marsden decides to get happy
20 Day Stranger anonymously pairs you up with a stranger at random

Rhodri Marsden: Is Twitter making you miserable? Befriending a stranger might help

I've just been reading about a social-media campaign where a marketing team spent two months planning a tweet about a brand of cheese. When finally unleashed, said tweet disappeared up the timeline virtually unnoticed, burning out immediately like a moth in a flame.

Rhodri Marsden's Interesting Objects: Linus's blanket

* If the comic strip Peanuts was, as Charles M Schulz once said, "a study in disappointment", the character of Linus was a wonderful study of insecurity. Sixty years ago this weekend, the bright but somewhat troubled child was pictured carrying a security blanket for the first time. Charlie Brown asks Lucy why he's holding it. "I'm not sure," she replies.

Rhodri Marsden: Believe it or not, the author of Game of Thrones likes to keep it simple

I'm typing this on a blank screen. If we disregard the pigeon outside my window and the movement of my fingers on the keyboard, there are no other visual distractions. No menus, no toolbars, no bouncing alerts, no wavy lines to help with my speling (sic) or opportunities to change the way that the words look. It's got to be that way.

Rhodri Marsden: With so many big numbers online, something just doesn't add up

'That's one like, but it's pretty big - how do we count that?'

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Farewell, my lovely

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