Rhodri Marsden

Rhodri Marsden is the Technology Columnist for The Independent; he has also written about crumpets, Captain Beefheart, rude place names and string. He's also a musician who plays in the band Scritti Politti, and won the under-10 piano category at the 1980 Watford Music Festival by playing a piece called "Silver Trumpets" with verve and aplomb.

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Rhodri Marsden's Interesting Objects: Oscar Wilde's cabbage

So the story goes, a malodorous cabbage landed at Oscar Wilde's feet as he addressed his audience. "Thank you, my friend," said the celebrated wit, raconteur and playwright as he picked it up. "Every time I smell it, I shall be reminded of you." It's probably an apocryphal tale, but it's based on a vegetable-related incident that took place 120 years ago today at St James's Theatre, London, at the premiere of Wilde's play, The Importance of Being Earnest.

Umoove Experience uses eye tracking to control flight simulation

Motion tracking at eyeball level looks set to be a big game-changer in 2015

A forthcoming version of Assassin's Creed will come with an eye-tracking add-on, while Umoove Experience uses eye tracking to control flight simulation

Rhodri Marsden's interesting objects: Brer Fox an' Brer Rabbit board game

Patented in 1904, The Newbie Game Company's game was designed to demonstrate the evils of exploitative landowners

Just one of many bad reviews that can be found on TripAdvisor

Uber drivers fight back: the companies writing online reviews of customers - and why we kind of deserve it

Just as we're prompted to rate companies, they are now rating us, too. And if we get ourselves a bad reputation the service can be withheld, says Rhodri Marsden
In the past, if you heard a new song you liked, you would dance over to the jukebox and squint through the glass cover

Shazam: The progress and appeal of the 'what's that song?' app that's now worth $1 billion

Its success is testament to the idea’s cleverness and investors’ patience

Rhodri Marsden's Interesting Object: The passport photograph

Passport photos were hastily ushered in 100 years ago following an incident of wartime espionage

Pplkpr: If real friendship makes your heart beat faster, this absurdly-named app isn't for you

The app is designed to optimise relationships by monitoring our attitudes towards each other and prioritising certain people over others

How do you like them Apples?: a happy customer celebrates after being the first person to purchase the iPhone 6 in London, last September

Record Apple profits: We addicts are all too happy to be milked for our cash

We have been brainwashed by the Cult Of Mac

The Oliver twins, Philip and Andrew, at work creating the 'Dizzy' arcade-adventure games in 1988

Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

For one moment three decades ago, the British computer-games industry was a few thousand kids with a cheap computer, a tape recorder and a punk-like passion for the mysteries of programming. As a retro version of the ZX Spectrum gears up for release, Rhodri Marsden charts the rise and fall of the video-game punks

Rhodri Marsden's Interesting Object: The beer can

* Shake it up and spray it all over your best mate while shouting, because today marks the 80th anniversary of the sale of the first can of beer. Laughable beer canning experiments had taken place in the USA since 1905 – usually concluding with a small explosion – but prohibition kicked the problem down the road, giving the canning industry a chance to work on a solution. By the early 1930s, the American Can Company decided that the world was finally ready.

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