Richard Garner

Richard Garner has been Education Editor of The Independent for 12 years and writing about the subject for 34 years. Before becoming a journalist, he worked as a disc jockey in London pubs and clubs and for a hospital radio station. His main hobbies are cricket (watching these days) and theatre. On his days off, he is most likelt to be found at Lord’s or the King’s Head Theatre Club.

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Teachers in England work longer hours than the rest of the world - but not in the classroom

Teachers in England work longer hours than the rest of the world but spend less time in the classroom than in other countries, says a major international study.

Michael Gove, the Secretary of State for Eduction

Michael Gove's planned shake-up of A-levels 'will cost teachers their jobs'

A 'decoupling' of AS-level exams from A-levels mean far fewer students are expected to sit the exam

The diverse ethnic mix in inner-London schools could be a key reason behind the dramatic improvement in the capital’s exam results

Ethnic mix boosts London schools results

The diverse ethnic mix in inner-London schools could be a key reason behind the dramatic improvement in the capital’s exam results, according to a study out today.

A recruitment crisis has left thousands of schools unable to fill vacancies on their governing bodies, as potential candidates are intimidated by their responsibilities

Exclusive: Schools struggling to fill governor posts as candidates daunted by work

The concern is that academies are going to find it harder and harder to recruit new governors

Michael Gove's former adviser has ratcheted up his attack on David Cameron

Ex-Gove adviser Dominic Cummings resumes attack on Cameron

Dominic Cummings, former adviser to the Education Secretary, Michael Gove, has ratcheted up his attack on David Cameron saying the Prime Minister would fail to impose change on Whitehall while “watching Netflix with a glass of red wine in his paw”.

Chief schools inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw has said that comprehensive schools represent the only chance of giving all pupils a decent education

Comprehensive schools the 'only way' to decent education for all, says Ofsted chief

Comprehensive schools are still associated with “mediocrity, laxity and failure” in the minds of many people, but represent the only chance of giving all pupils a decent education, chief schools inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw said today.

Only 13 per cent of state school heads insisted all pupils took part in competitive sports

State schools are ‘failing to produce top sports stars’

State school pupils are “woefully under-represented” in top sports teams, chief schools inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw will say today.

Last year, a total of 75,000 children failed to clear the hurdle at 11

Pupils who can't read properly by 11 destined for lives of underachievement

Thousands of pupils who fail to read properly by the age of 11 will be sentenced to a lifetime of underachievement, according to a report out today.

Reform of 'messy, muddled' higher education system could see half of Britain's universities closed

Half the country’s universities should be closed in sweeping reforms to the UK’s “messy, muddled” higher education system, according to the former head of the body which represents university vice-chancellors.

Sir Howard Newby, vice-chancellor of Liverpool University says that higher institutions should be able to set their own tuition fees

Let universities set their own tuition fees, urges Liverpool University boss

Universities should be left free to set their own charges for degree courses, according to one of the country’s leading university vice-chancellors.

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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn