Richard Garner

Richard Garner is The Independent's Education Editor.

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International A-level exam is a star performer

A-levels may have their detractors in the UK but the international version of the exam is proving popular abroad.

Do the maths: GCSE study could start at age 13 when new exams are introduced

GCSE shake-up means fewer subjects for pupils to take

Government attempts to make exams harder will be wrongfooted by schools starting core subject courses a year early
School and college staff responsible for running GCSE and A-level exams could quit their jobs in large numbers

Exams office staff affected by burn-out over reforms

School and college staff responsible for running GCSE and A-level exams could quit their jobs in large numbers because of burn-out linked to the constant upheaval in the system, a new report warns.

The study looked at the 88 primary and 63 secondary schools established in the first three years of the policy

Government's flagship free schools accused of allowing 'stealth selection' as they fail to admit poorest kids

Free schools have been accused of “cherry-picking” bright and wealthy pupils after a major study found that even those established in deprived areas are failing to admit the neediest children.

The Government has been accused of lacking enthusiasm for vocational education in the past

Government announces seven new university technical colleges

A major expansion for the network of top-class university technical colleges for 14 to 18-year-olds has been given the go-ahead by ministers.

A significant drop in the number of primary school children taking part in dance, music and drama has been highlighted in a report by Labour

Number of primary school children taking part in arts activities has dropped by a third since the last election, Labour claims

A significant drop in the number of primary school children taking part in dance, music and drama is highlighted in a report by Labour today.

Number of job vacancies requiring a first-class degree has fallen by 80 per cent in two years, study finds

Fewer employers are insisting on applicants for jobs having a first-class degree, according to research published today.

One in five teenagers could miss out on a place at a top university as a result of ministers relying on 'flawed' data for their exam reforms, according to researchers

A-level reforms based on 'flawed' data will deny university

The Department for Education research concluded that degree results could still be predicted just as accurately without AS-level results

Students are paying £150 a time to have their essays and dissertations “edited”

Concerns grow over rise in essay-editing firms that 'prey on student insecurities'

Students are paying £150 a time to have their essays and dissertations “edited” to give them a better chance of obtaining a top degree pass.

40% drop in children sitting GCSEs early, Ofqual figures show

A dramatic drop in the number of children pushed by schools into taking their GCSE exams a year early is revealed in new statistics published by exams regulator Ofqual.

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Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands ahead of the US midterm elections

Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands

The Senator for Colorado is for gay rights, for abortion rights – and in the Republicans’ sights as they threaten to take control of the Senate next month
New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

Evidence found of contact between Easter Islanders and South America
Cerys Matthews reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of Dylan Thomas

Cerys Matthews on Dylan Thomas

The singer reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of the famous Welsh poet
DIY is not fun and we've finally realised this as a nation

Homebase closures: 'DIY is not fun'

Homebase has announced the closure of one in four of its stores. Nick Harding, who never did know his awl from his elbow, is glad to see the back of DIY
The Battle of the Five Armies: Air New Zealand releases new Hobbit-inspired in-flight video

Air New Zealand's wizard in-flight video

The airline has released a new Hobbit-inspired clip dubbed "The most epic safety video ever made"
Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month - but can you stomach the sweetness?

Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month

The combination of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg (and no actual pumpkin), now flavours everything from lattes to cream cheese in the US
11 best sonic skincare brushes

11 best sonic skincare brushes

Forget the flannel - take skincare to the next level by using your favourite cleanser with a sonic facial brush
Paul Scholes column: I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Phil Jones and Marcos Rojo

Paul Scholes column

I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Jones and Rojo
Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

While other sports are stalked by corruption, we are an easy target for the critics
Jamie Roberts exclusive interview: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Jamie Roberts: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Wales centre says he’s not coming home but is looking to establish himself at Racing Métro
How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?
Meet 'Porridge' and 'Vampire': Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker

Lost in translation: Western monikers

Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker. Simon Usborne, who met a 'Porridge' and a 'Vampire' while in China, can see the problem
Handy hacks that make life easier: New book reveals how to rid your inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone

Handy hacks that make life easier

New book reveals how to rid your email inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone with a loo-roll
KidZania lets children try their hands at being a firefighter, doctor or factory worker for the day

KidZania: It's a small world

The new 'educational entertainment experience' in London's Shepherd's Bush will allow children to try out the jobs that are usually undertaken by adults, including firefighter, doctor or factory worker