Richard Garner

Richard Garner is The Independent's Education Editor.

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Parents who send their children to private schools are twice as likely to pay for extra private tuition, research suggests

Schools should use pupil premium to give disadvantaged children's private tuition, charity says

Move would help close gap with privately educated kids

The Sports Hall has been installed as part of the new £30m building

Bow school's state-of-the-art £30m campus is last to benefit from scrapped Building Schools for the Future programme

The Labour scheme was axed by the former Education Secretary, Michael Gove, soon after taking office - on the grounds that spending on it had been "profligate"

Are English students losing out because of Michael Gove's GCSE reforms?

One little-known fact to emerge out of this year's GCSE results: students in England may be at a disadvantage when it comes to the grades that they are given.

How to group pupils depends on the school, the ability of the teachers and the confidence of the head in their staff

Setting, streaming or all ability teaching - that is the question (to parody Hamlet).

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan said there was 'absolutely no truth' in suggestions that Ofsted would be asked to promote setting

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan forced to deny plans to separate schoolchildren by ability

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan has denied she is planning to force all secondary schools into introducing ability groups.

A poster protesting against Michael Gove is displayed outside Oldknow Academy, one of the Birmingham Schools at the centre of the 'Trojan Horse' affair, earlier this year

Trojan Horse schools: Jihadi film was shown to schoolchildren

Investigators tell MPs of evidence of "very bad behaviour" at Birmingham schools

The new reforms have been introduced because of concern over the standard of computer technology teaching in the past

Five-year-olds to be taught vital computing skills like coding in schools

Parents will struggle to help five-year-olds with their homework now they are being taught computing skills for the first time, according to a survey published today.

A survey of 12 of the schools in the AET chain found that five required improvement and one was inadequate

Half of schools in UK’s biggest academy chain are failing pupils

David Hoare,  the new head of Ofsted, was until recently a trustee of Academies Enterprise Trust

Religious leaders want a ban on faith schools excluding pupils because of their beliefs

The number of children that can be selected on the grounds of faith should be limited to 50 per cent, says campaign group

All primary school children will receive free school meals if the Liberal Democrats have a role in the next government

Free school meals: Lib Dems promise to expand policy to all primary school pupils in next parliament

The policy will be included in a pre-election manifesto to be published later this week

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The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

The drugs revolution starts now as MPs agree its high time for change

Commons debate highlights growing cross-party consensus on softening UK drugs legislation, unchanged for 43 years
The camera is turned on tabloid editors in Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter'

Gotcha! The camera is turned on tabloid editors

Hugh Grant says Richard Peppiatt's 'One Rogue Reporter' documentary will highlight issues raised by Leveson
Fall of the Berlin Wall: It was thanks to Mikhail Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell

Fall of the Berlin Wall

It was thanks to Gorbachev that this symbol of division fell
Halloween 2014: What makes Ouija boards, demon dolls, and evil clowns so frightening?

What makes ouija boards and demon dolls scary?

Ouija boards, demon dolls, evil children and clowns are all classic tropes of horror, and this year’s Halloween releases feature them all. What makes them so frightening, decade after decade?
A safari in modern Britain: Rose Rouse reveals how her four-year tour of Harlesden taught her as much about the UK as it did about NW10

Rose Rouse's safari in modern Britain

Rouse decided to walk and talk with as many different people as possible in her neighbourhood of Harlesden and her experiences have been published in a new book
Welcome to my world of no smell and odd tastes: How a bike accident left one woman living with unwanted food mash-ups

'My world of no smell and odd tastes'

A head injury from a bicycle accident had the surprising effect of robbing Nell Frizzell of two of her senses

Matt Parker is proud of his square roots

The "stand-up mathematician" is using comedy nights to preach maths to big audiences
Paul Scholes column: Beating Manchester City is vital part of life at Manchester United. This is first major test for Luke Shaw, Angel Di Maria and Radamel Falcao – it’s not a game to lose

Paul Scholes column

Beating City is vital part of life at United. This is first major test for Shaw, Di Maria and Falcao – it’s not a game to lose
Frank Warren: Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing

Frank Warren column

Call me an old git, but I just can't see that there's a place for women’s boxing
Adrian Heath interview: Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room

Adrian Heath's American dream...

Former Everton striker prepares his Orlando City side for the MLS - and having Kaka in the dressing room
Simon Hart: Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manchester City will rise again but they need to change their attitude

Manuel Pellegrini’s side are too good to fail and derby allows them to start again, says Simon Hart
Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes