Rob Sharp

Rob Sharp is a freelance journalist specialising in arts and culture. He was on staff at The Independent from July 2007 to December 2011, first as a features writer, and then as the paper’s arts correspondent. He has written for a wide range of newspapers and magazines. For more information visit his website, www.robsharp.com or email him at rs@robsharp.com.

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Cressida Hubbard (third from left) and Lily Markiewicz (on the right) with their co-housing colleagues in Hackney

How to build a house...with 20 friends: Families across the country are turning to co-housing

Groups of families - put off by huge house prices- are joining together to build their own housing complexes from scratch
2008. Battle Company

Tim Hetherington: The humanity of war

Photographer Tim Hetherington was killed on assignment. But his legacy, an extraordinary portfolio that captures everyday life in the heat of battle in Afghanistan, lives on – as a new exhibition shows. By Rob Sharp

James Salter: Tears up the creative writing rulebook

Review: All That Is, By James Salter

It would be discourteous to suggest that James Salter's first novel for 35 years could be his last – but it would provide a fine epitaph

John Le Carré: Tackles modern themes, but his latest novel’s soul is rooted in the Cold War

Review: A Delicate Truth, By John le Carré

The spy who came in from the shadow of the wall

Review: The Hunger and the Howling of Killian Lone, By Will Storr

Can't stand the hero? Leave the kitchen

Yes, I can wear pants all day, but the novelty wears off – there’s work to be done

The clichés about  working from home are true. You can stay in your underpants all day

Bradbury lets 'Farenheit 451' join e-book revolution

Ray Bradbury, the author of science fiction novel Fahrenheit 451, had always forbidden his book from being published electronically, claiming e-books "smell like burned fuel". But now the author, 91, has caved in under pressure from his publisher.

Frequent swearers such as Gordon Ramsay can utter profanities without feeling an emotional response, and thus do not get the same pain-relieving effects

Swearing is good for you (unless you're like Gordon)

Study reveals that cursing can relieve pain – but only when practised in moderation

Computing in class 'needs reboot'

One of the country's top games experts says Britain is missing out on the opportunity to nurture the next creator of Facebook, Twitter or Google because of the way computing is taught in schools.

Activists from Liberate Tate pouran oil-like substance over a naked group member in the middle of the Tate Britain

Tate trustee reignites BP row ahead of Turner Prize

Patrick Brill brands oil company "a disgrace", as campaign groups call for end of sponsorship deal

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine