Rob Sharp

Rob Sharp is a freelance journalist specialising in arts and culture. He was on staff at The Independent from July 2007 to December 2011, first as a features writer, and then as the paper’s arts correspondent. He has written for a wide range of newspapers and magazines. For more information visit his website, www.robsharp.com or email him at rs@robsharp.com.

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Cressida Hubbard (third from left) and Lily Markiewicz (on the right) with their co-housing colleagues in Hackney

How to build a house...with 20 friends: Families across the country are turning to co-housing

Groups of families - put off by huge house prices- are joining together to build their own housing complexes from scratch
2008. Battle Company

Tim Hetherington: The humanity of war

Photographer Tim Hetherington was killed on assignment. But his legacy, an extraordinary portfolio that captures everyday life in the heat of battle in Afghanistan, lives on – as a new exhibition shows. By Rob Sharp

James Salter: Tears up the creative writing rulebook

Review: All That Is, By James Salter

It would be discourteous to suggest that James Salter's first novel for 35 years could be his last – but it would provide a fine epitaph

John Le Carré: Tackles modern themes, but his latest novel’s soul is rooted in the Cold War

Review: A Delicate Truth, By John le Carré

The spy who came in from the shadow of the wall

Review: The Hunger and the Howling of Killian Lone, By Will Storr

Can't stand the hero? Leave the kitchen

Yes, I can wear pants all day, but the novelty wears off – there’s work to be done

The clichés about  working from home are true. You can stay in your underpants all day

Bradbury lets 'Farenheit 451' join e-book revolution

Ray Bradbury, the author of science fiction novel Fahrenheit 451, had always forbidden his book from being published electronically, claiming e-books "smell like burned fuel". But now the author, 91, has caved in under pressure from his publisher.

Frequent swearers such as Gordon Ramsay can utter profanities without feeling an emotional response, and thus do not get the same pain-relieving effects

Swearing is good for you (unless you're like Gordon)

Study reveals that cursing can relieve pain – but only when practised in moderation

Computing in class 'needs reboot'

One of the country's top games experts says Britain is missing out on the opportunity to nurture the next creator of Facebook, Twitter or Google because of the way computing is taught in schools.

Activists from Liberate Tate pouran oil-like substance over a naked group member in the middle of the Tate Britain

Tate trustee reignites BP row ahead of Turner Prize

Patrick Brill brands oil company "a disgrace", as campaign groups call for end of sponsorship deal

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Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn