Robert Fisk

Robert Fisk is The Independent’s multiple award-winning Middle East correspondent, based in Beirut

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Which superpower will win the battle of hypocrisy?

The 125,000 civilian casualties of the two Chechen wars elicited far less passion in the West than the fatalities in Syria

Ever since revolution broke out in 2011, experts have been predicting the fall of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad – but he is still clinging on

Syria revolution four years on: Don't bet against President Assad – a ruler willing to see his country destroyed so long as he can cling to power

The West's latest 'Arab Hitler' continues to rule despite the widespread predictions of his downfall. Just what is the man's secret, asks Robert Fisk

Pakistani school children leave the Army Public School after it was reopened following an attack by Taliban militants, in Peshawar

Being coy doesn’t change the reality of modern Pakistan — a a corrupt, politically savage, and physically broken society

Pakistan wilfully became an Islamic Republic and allowed religious bigotry to overwhelm its population

The new king, Salman, is 79 and suffered a stroke in 2010

Who can the Saudis trust when they find themselves on Netanyahu's side?

John Kerry's reassurances over the US-Iran deal will settle few nerves in the royal palaces, writes Robert Fisk

'The difference between America and Israel? There isn't one'

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America – with the same confidence that he can support his army when they slaughter hundreds of children in Gaza

Egypt’s deposed President Mohamed Morsi in the defendant’s cage during his trial in Cairo last November

Egypt coup: Leaked tape proves defence minister tried to conceal Morsi’s true location in military prison, say forensic scientists

Egypt’s generals always denied their 2013 power grab was a coup d’état. But now the UN will consider devastating tapes that expose their story as a lie

Turkish army vehicles drive in a street of the Syrian town of Kobani on 21 February, 2015

Shah Suleyman: The truly Byzantine origins of Turkey's operation to rescue a long-dead body from the 'Islamic Caliphate'

The 13th-century fall of an obscure king into the river Euphrates, the pride of the Ottoman empire and modern Turkey and a humiliating French retreat after the 1914-18 war provide the truly Byzantine origins of Turkey’s little military operation to remove a long-dead body from the “Islamic Caliphate” this weekend. All that – and the fear that Isis forces might destroy a shrine in civil-war Syria that has been jealously guarded by Turkey since 1921.

Ethel Raine, who worked for MI5 1915-20

Ethel Raine: The untold story of a woman who spied for Britain during the Great War

MI5 confirmed to Raine's grandson of his grandmother's incredible occupation, and he began investigating...

Isis militants waving an Islamist flag after the seizure of an Iraqi army checkpoint in Salahuddin

Isis has provoked an Arab alliance to bomb the West’s enemies

Obama can take satisfaction in seeing ‘moderate’ Middle Eastern friends flying alongside

Talking to Isis could lead to peace, yet for some reason we’re not allowed to do it

The highly politicised 'listing' of armed groups by governments has been found to achieve very little

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It's oh so quiet!

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If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
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...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
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Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
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The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
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End of the Aussie brain drain

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Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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