Rupert Cornwell

Known for his commentary on international relations and US politics, Rupert Cornwell also contributes obituaries and occasionally even a column for the sports pages. With The Independent since its launch in 1986, he was the paper's first Moscow correspondent - covering the collapse of the Soviet Union – during which time he won two British Press Awards. Previously a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times and Reuters, he has also been a diplomatic correspondent, leader writer and columnist, and has served as Washington bureau editor. In 1983 he published God's Banker, about Roberto Calvi, the Italian banker found hanging from Blackfriars Bridge.

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Police advance through a cloud of tear gas toward demonstrators

Ferguson: The issue Obama must tackle is white control in black areas

The violence in Ferguson is small beer compared to the 1965 conflagration in Watts, the rioting that swept US cities after the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King, and the Los Angeles riots of 1992 after the acquittal of white police officers charged with beating-up the black motorist Rodney King.

Barack Obama yawns at an East Asian Summit Plenary Session at the Peace Palace in Phnom Penh on November 20, 2012.

Is Barack Obama just swinging out his reign?

Out of America: Second presidential terms are rarely productive, but there may be a way to put an end to this wasteful lame-duckery
Sunny days: Sant’Agata de’ Goti, Italy, which made Bill de Blasio an honorary citizen

Bill de Blasio: The man who dared to go on holiday

Out of America: New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir
US President Barack Obama, right, meeting with Ed Miliband at Buckingham Palace in London

Ed Miliband goes for his 'job interview' at White House

Labour likely to meet Mr Obama off-camera, away from the formal setting of the Oval Office

Early days: Rand Paul has a libertarian’s distaste for foreign intervention, which plays well with the US public

Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Out of America: The junior senator for Kentucky is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Left in limbo: Refugee children in a processing centre in Brownsville, Texas

Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Out of America: Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate people from some of the most dangerous countries in the world
Traditional spying techniques as depicted in books and films like ‘Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy’ are still the most successful

The hi-tech world is not enough – all the best spies are human

For all the NSA’s billions of intercepted calls and super-sophisticated algorithms, it failed to predict the 9/11 attacks. But what if the US had had an al-Qa’ida mole? Rupert Cornwell takes a not-very-secret look at the world’s second-oldest profession

Double bind: The American public is warweary, but fears Barack Obama’s refusal to militarily intervene is diminishing its global role

Don't underestimate the power of the US dollar

Out of America: If its military and diplomatic clout is waning in parts of the world, there's one area where it's still in charge: money

Howard Baker: US Senate leader and Chief of Staff whose moderate brand of Republicanism is today a vanishing force

"What did the president know and when did he know it?" Those words – among the most famous lines in all American politics, encapsulating the Watergate scandal – were delivered by Howard Baker, then Senator from Tennessee and throughout his career the standard-bearer of a moderate Republicanism that today is all but extinct.

Road to nowhere: North Carolina’s Highway 12 after Hurricane Irene struck in 2011

If King Canute had a roads policy... North Carolina's Highway 12 is at the centre of a ferocious and politically charged dispute

Out of America: One of the US's most scenic roads is under threat, but the chorus of climate-change deniers prevents action
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Day In a Page

On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

Thongs ain't what they used to be

Big knickers are back
Thurston Moore interview

Thurston Moore interview

On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
In full bloom

In full bloom

Floral print womenswear
From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

From leading man to Elephant Man

Bradley Cooper is terrific
In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

Dame Colette Bowe - interview
When do the creative juices dry up?

When do the creative juices dry up?

David Lodge thinks he knows
The 'Cher moment' happening across fashion just now

Fashion's Cher moment

Ageing beauty will always be more classy than all that booty
Thousands of teenage girls enduring debilitating illnesses after routine school cancer vaccination

Health fears over school cancer jab

Shock new Freedom of Information figures show how thousands of girls have suffered serious symptoms after routine HPV injection
Fifa President Sepp Blatter warns his opponents: 'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

Fifa president Sepp Blatter issues defiant warning to opponents
Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report

Weather warning

Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report
LSD: Speaking to volunteer users of the drug as trials get underway to see if it cures depression and addiction

High hopes for LSD

Meet the volunteer users helping to see if it cures depression and addiction
German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians

Saving Private Brandt

A Belgian museum's display of the skeleton of a soldier killed at Waterloo prompts calls for him to be given a dignified funeral